UM study reveals demographic trend of the Jewish population in Broward County

March 10, 2009

BROWARD COUNTY, FL. (March 10, 2009)--South Florida has the second most populous Jewish community in America, after New York. Jewish people traditionally settled in South Florida for economic opportunities, for the climate, to join friends and family and to retire. Nonetheless, the once growing Jewish population of Broward County is now declining in numbers, according to a recent study conducted by University of Miami professor Dr. Ira M. Sheskin, from the department of Geography and Regional Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences and director of the Jewish Demography Project of the Sue and Leonard Miller Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies.

The study funded by Temple Beth Emet of Cooper City is a description of the size, decrease and geographic distribution of the Jewish community of Broward and concludes that much of the drop in population is in the 65 and over age cohort.

"In Broward the elderly are not being replaced," Sheskin said "What may act to slow this trend is that in the next five years or so, the baby boomers will begin to retire in large numbers."

In 1997, 46% of Jews in Broward were 65 years of age and over. Much of this population has now died, explained Sheskin. Other important findings included in the study are: Most of the Jews population decline in Broward was the elderly. Their absence will be felt in the neighborhoods, synagogues, and businesses that cater to the Jewish population, explained Sheskin. The full report can be found at www.jewishdatabank.org under "What's New."
-end-
The University of Miami's mission is to educate and nurture students, to create knowledge, and to provide service to our community and beyond. Committed to excellence and proud of the diversity of our University family, we strive to develop future leaders of our nation and the world. www.miami.edu

University of Miami

Related Elderly Articles from Brightsurf:

Amyloid deposits not associated with depression in the elderly
Researchers have suspected that Aβ deposits might also underlie the cognitive decline seen in older people with depression, however a new study from researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has found that abnormal Aβ deposits were actually found in fewer older adults with major depression compared to non-depressed control subjects.

Children think robots can help the elderly -- but not their own grandparents
A study that asked children to assess three different robots showed that they responded most positively to simple robots shaped like flower pots, and were most sceptical of Pepper the robot, which looks more human.

Elderly people's response to COVID-19 not as expected
Survey results from 27 countries suggest that, despite their increased risk of severe illness due to COVID-19, elderly people are not more willing to isolate when asked to, and are not more compliant with several COVID-19 preventive measures.

T cell immunity in the elderly
A study by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) expands the understanding of the molecular pathways that control T cell function and survival and how it relates to declining T cell immunity in the elderly.

Socioeconomic inequalities are decisive in the health of the elderly
Researchers at the UPV/EHU, Osakidetza and the Department of Health have reviewed scientific papers that analyse the relationship between socioeconomic inequalities and health among the elderly population in Spain.

Brain cancer survival has improved -- but not much for elderly
A new study from Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki and the Finnish Cancer Registry shows that survival after glioblastoma has improved since the millennium.

New program keeps elderly out of emergency
A medical program developed by emergency and palliative care clinicians at a large Australian hospital is seeing elderly aged care residents successfully treated at home.

Why are the elderly increasingly more inclined to live alone?
For decades, the elderly in Spain have shown a preference for living at home, either alone or with their partners, instead of sharing a home with relatives of other generations.

Do the elderly want technology to help them take their medication?
Over 65s say they would find technology to help them take their medications helpful, but need the technology to be familiar, accessible and easy to use, according to research by Queen Mary University of London and University of Cambridge.

One in 4 elderly Australian women have dementia
At least a quarter of Australian women over 70 will develop dementia according to University of Queensland researchers.

Read More: Elderly News and Elderly Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.