This week from AGU: Less summer fog in California, increasing diversity in the geosciences

March 10, 2015

From AGU's blogs:More urban heat; less summer fog, on California coast

The summer fog that shrouds coastal southern California - what locals call the June Gloom - is being driven up into the sky by urban sprawl, according to scientists who have studied 67 years of cloud heights and urban growth in the region. Less fog may, at first, seem like a good thing. But less fog is bad news for native plants in the coastal hills and mountains, which depend on the cool fog as their only source of water during the rainless summer months. So less fog means warmer, drier, less healthy hillsides and potentially more fires.

The new findings were accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

From Eos.org:Increasing Diversity in the Geosciences

Studies show that increasing students' "sense of belonging" may help retain underrepresented minorities in geoscience fields. A few programs highlight successes.
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The American Geophysical Union is dedicated to advancing the Earth and space sciences for the benefit of humanity through its scholarly publications, conferences, and outreach programs. AGU is a not-for-profit, professional, scientific organization representing more than 62,000 members in 144 countries. Join our conversation on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other social media channels.

American Geophysical Union

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