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Driving the best science to meet global health challenges

March 10, 2015

The 9th European Congress on Tropical Medicine and International Health brings together some 2'000 of the most distinguished scientists and experts in the field of tropical medicine and international health. It is the premier European congress in this field. Participants will address new solutions for the most neglected populations on the planet and especially how to apply the best science for global health challenges.

Throughout plenaries, seminars and six to eight parallel scientific sessions, the conference will reflect on global health challenges, neglected diseases, the millennium development goals and what comes after. The event will also offer a platform to reinforce and further promote public-private-partnerships and policy dialogue towards addressing global health challenges. The congress will provide a forum for scientists, politicians, NGOs, and public and private health experts to exchange new ideas and to discuss solutions to the global health challenges of today and tomorrow.

The congress will be a prime venue for science and health journalists to meet global health scientists and experts from academia, industry, governmental and non-governmental organisations.

Conference Website: http://www.ectmih2015.ch
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Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

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