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Pitt stops, a rock maze, and the 1889 Johnstown Flood

March 10, 2017

Boulder, Colorado, USA: A new field guide in conjunction with GSA's Joint Northeastern and North-Central Section meeting details three trips around the area. Each trip is designed so it can be done in one day or shorter.

The first highlights a seven-"Pitt-stops" walking tour of downtown Pittsburgh, providing an introduction and overview of the geological, archaeological, and historical aspects of the first Gateway to the West. The second trip explores periglacial features, including glacial Lake Monongahela and a rock maze formed by frost wedging. The third investigates hydrologic aspects of the 1889 Johnstown, Pennsylvania, flood, largely following the progress of the flood from its point of origin to the city of Johnstown.

Editors Joseph T. Hannibal, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, and Kyle C. Fredrick, California University of Pennsylvania, have dedicated this volume to John A. Harper, "a true ambassador of our discipline." They praise him for being as "enthusiastic and knowledgeable about regional geologic information as he is about connecting people that share interests on the topics."

Individual copies of the volume may be purchased through The Geological Society of America online store, http://rock.geosociety.org/Store/detail.aspx?id=FLD046, or by contacting GSA Sales and Service, gsaservice@geosociety.org.
-end-
Book editors of earth science journals/publications may request a review copy by contacting April Leo, aleo@geosociety.org.

Forts, Floods, and Periglacial Features: Exploring the Pittsburgh Low Plateau and Upper Youghiogheny Basin
Edited by Joseph T. Hannibal and Kyle C. Fredrick
Geological Society of America Field Guide 46
FLD046, 63 p., $37; GSA member price $26
ISBN 978-0-8137-0046-5
View the table of contents: http://rock.geosociety.org/store/TOC/FLD046.pdf

Learn more about the meeting at http://www.geosociety.org/nc-mtg.

http://www.geosociety.org

Geological Society of America

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