Nav: Home

NASA gets a last look at Tropical Depression Enawo's final bow

March 10, 2017

Ex-tropical Cyclone Enawo moved off the southern coast of Madagascar and strengthened back into a tropical storm for a brief period before weakening to a depression. NASA's Terra satellite captured a look at the storm as wind shear continued to batter the storm weakening it further.

Enawo regenerated off the southeastern coast of Madagascar on March 10 at 0000 UTC (Mar. 9 at 7 p.m. EST) when it was about 434 nautical miles (499 miles/ 804 km) southeast of Europa Island. Enawo's maximum sustained winds spun up to 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph) as the reborn storm moved to the south-southeast at 22 knots (25.3 mph/40.7 kph).

When NASA's Terra satellite flew over Tropical Depression Enawo on March 10 at 0515 UTC (12:15 a.m. EST) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument took a visible light picture of the storm. The image revealed that moderate to strong vertical wind shear had stretched out the clouds associated with the low pressure area. The bulk of the depression's clouds were pushed south of the center.

By 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST), vertical wind shear battering the storm had weakened its maximum sustained winds to 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph). It was located about 557 nautical miles (641 miles/1,032 km) southwest of St. Denis, La Reunion Island and was moving to the southeast at 13 knots (14.9 mph/24.0 kph). At that time, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii said "Animated multispectral satellite imagery showed the low level circulation has unraveled and the associated convection has collapsed and dispersed due to high vertical wind shear."

That statement marked the JTWC's final warning on Enawo as the system was being sheared apart in the Southern Indian Ocean.

Rob Gutro NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Depression Articles:

Tackling depression by changing the way you think
A thought is a thought. It does not reflect reality.
How depression can muddle thinking
Depression is associated with sadness, fatigue and a lack of motivation.
Neuroimaging categorizes 4 depression subtypes
Patients with depression can be categorized into four unique subtypes defined by distinct patterns of abnormal connectivity in the brain, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine.
Studies suggest inflammatory cytokines are associated with depression and psychosis, and that anti-cytokine treatment can reduce depression symptoms
Studies presented at this year's International Early Psychosis Association meeting in Milan, Italy, (Oct.
Is depression in parents, grandparents linked to grandchildren's depression?
Having both parents and grandparents with major depressive disorder was associated with higher risk of MDD for grandchildren, which could help identify those who may benefit from early intervention, according to a study published online by JAMA Psychiatry.
Postpartum depression least severe form of depression in mothers
Postpartum depression -- a household term since actress Brooke Shields went public in 2005 about her struggle with it -- is indeed serious.
Tropical Depression 1E dissipates
Tropical Depression 1E or TD1E didn't get far from the time it was born to the time it weakened to a remnant low pressure area along the southwestern coast of Mexico.
Diagnosing depression before it starts
MIT researchers have found that brain scans may identify children who are vulnerable to depression, before symptoms appear.
Men actually recommend getting help for depression
Participants in a national survey read a scenario describing someone who had depressed symptoms.
Depression too often reduced to a checklist of symptoms
How can you tell if someone is depressed? The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) -- the 'bible' of psychiatry -- diagnoses depression when patients tick off a certain number of symptoms on the DSM checklist.

Related Depression Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Don't Fear Math
Why do many of us hate, even fear math? Why are we convinced we're bad at it? This hour, TED speakers explore the myths we tell ourselves and how changing our approach can unlock the beauty of math. Guests include budgeting specialist Phylecia Jones, mathematician and educator Dan Finkel, math teacher Eddie Woo, educator Masha Gershman, and radio personality and eternal math nerd Adam Spencer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#517 Life in Plastic, Not Fantastic
Our modern lives run on plastic. It's in the computers and phones we use. It's in our clothing, it wraps our food. It surrounds us every day, and when we throw it out, it's devastating for the environment. This week we air a live show we recorded at the 2019 Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, D.C., where Bethany Brookshire sat down with three plastics researchers - Christina Simkanin, Chelsea Rochman, and Jennifer Provencher - and a live audience to discuss plastics in our oceans. Where they are, where they are going, and what they carry with them. Related links:...