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Study reveals rising colorectal cancer rates among young adults

March 10, 2020

A population-based analysis from England indicates that the incidence of colorectal cancer is increasing rapidly in young adults. The findings, which are published in BJS (British Journal of Surgery), suggest that colorectal cancer should no longer be considered a disease of older people.

For the analysis, investigators examined information on adults who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer in England between 1974 and 2015. Of the 1,145,639 new cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed between 1974 and 2015 in adults aged over 20 years, there were 2,594 in 20-29 year olds, 11,406 among 30-39 year olds and 42,134 in 40-49 year olds.

The most sustained increase in incidence rates was seen in adults aged 20-29 years. The magnitude of increases was similar in both sexes and across income levels. The most pronounced increases in incidence occurred in the southern regions of England.

Another article in BJS notes that young patients need more treatment to achieve similar outcomes to older patients.
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About Journal

With an impact factor of 5.572, BJS is the premier surgical journal in Europe and one of the top six surgical periodicals in the world. Its international readership is reflected in the prestigious international Editorial Board, supported by a panel of over 1200 reviewers worldwide.

BJS features the very best in clinical and laboratory-based research on all aspects of general surgery and related topics. Developing areas such as minimally invasive therapy and interventional radiology are strongly represented.

About Wiley

Wiley drives the world forward with research and education. Through publishing, platforms and services, we help students, researchers, universities, and corporations to achieve their goals in an ever-changing world. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to all of our stakeholders. The Company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

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