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New book examines ecology of threatened prairie-chickens

March 11, 2016

A new volume in the Cooper Ornithological Society's Studies in Avian Biology series highlights the ecology of Lesser Prairie-Chickens.

Ecology and Conservation of Lesser Prairie-Chickens, edited by David A. Haukos of Kansas State University and Clint Boal of Texas Tech University, is now available through CRC press. The book is divided into sections focusing on the history and legal status of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken, its ecology, the impact of emerging issues such as climate change and energy development, and its conservation and management. It includes a complete description of the landscapes inhabited by four distinct Lesser Prairie-Chicken populations.

"Publication of this volume was the culmination of nearly five years of effort by 31 contributors and Series Editor Brett Sandercock," say Haukos and Boal. "Given the perilous status of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken and impending decisions regarding listing the species as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act, there was a desperate need for a compilation of available information on the species' ecology to guide status assessments, listing decisions, and conservation planning. Our goal was to provide land managers, policy makers, and conservation planners with an easy-to-use guide to all known information regarding the ecology of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken."

For more details on the book, including ordering information, visit https://www.crcpress.com/Ecology-and-Conservation-of-Lesser-Prairie-Chickens/Haukos-Boal/9781482240221
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Central Ornithology Publication Office

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