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Ultrasonic surgery reduces pain and swelling after chin surgery

March 11, 2016

March 11, 2016 - For patients undergoing plastic surgery of the chin (genioplasty), the use of ultrasonic "piezosurgery" equipment reduces trauma, pain, and swelling, compared to traditional surgical drills, reports a study in the The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

"Piezosurgery may be a viable alternative to traditional osteotomy [bone-cutting] technique, as it reduces the degree of inflammation, pain, swelling, and morbidity, improving satisfaction and patient comfort," according to the report by Dr. Gilberto Sammartino of University of Naples Federico II, Italy, and colleagues.

Piezosurgery versus Traditional Instruments for Genioplasty

The researchers compared complications after genioplasty performed using piezosurgery devices or traditional rotating drills. Genioplasty, sometimes called mentoplasty, is a plastic surgery procedure done to reshape the chin--for example, augmenting or reducing it--for cosmetic and/or functional reasons.

Piezosurgery is a relatively new approach that uses ultrasonic energy, rather than conventional surgical instruments, for cutting of bone. "Several studies have demonstrated that bone healing using piezosurgery is more rapid than other techniques using drills or burs, thanks to a lower inflammatory bone response," Dr. Sammartino and coauthors write.

The study included 40 patients scheduled for genioplasty, as a primary procedure or after corrective jaw surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo genioplasty using either ultrasonic piezosurgery instruments or traditional drills. Pain, healing, and complications were compared from one to 15 days after surgery.

The results showed lower pain scores for patients undergoing piezosurgery, although the difference was significant only on the third and seventh day after surgery. Swelling also seemed to be reduced with piezosurgery, compared to cutting drills.

Both groups had reduced feeling in the chin area throughout the first 15 days after surgery, mainly due to nerve stretching. By six months, sensation normalized within six months for all patients in both groups. Pain and swelling were completely resolved as well.

Previous studies have shown that piezosurgery leads to better control of the inflammatory bone response induced by surgery, and less cell damage leading to increased bone remodeling after surgery. Dr. Sammartino and colleagues conclude, "Bone undergoes less stress during surgery and thus less pain and swelling postoperatively, which is in agreement with the results found in our trial: pain and discomfort were minimal compared to the traditional technique (saw and drills) especially in the immediate postoperative period of healing (within 3 days)."
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Click here to read "The Use of Piezosurgery in Genioplasty."

Article: "The Use of Piezosurgery in Genioplasty" (doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000002473)

About The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery serves as a forum of communication for all those involved in craniofacial and maxillofacial surgery. Coverage ranges from practical aspects of craniofacial surgery to the basic science that underlies surgical practice. Affiliates include 14 major specialty societies around the world, including the American Association of Pediatric Plastic Surgeons, the American Academy of Pediatrics Section of Pediatric Plastic Surgery, the American Society of Craniofacial Surgeons, the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons, the Argentine Society of Plastic Surgery Section of Pediatric Plastic Surgery, the Asian Pacific Craniofacial Association, the Association of Military Plastic Surgeons of the U.S., the Brazilian Society of Craniofacial Surgeons, the European Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the International Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the Japanese Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the Korean Society of Craniofacial Surgery, the Thai Cleft and Craniofacial Association, and the World Craniofacial Foundation.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information services. Professionals in the areas of legal, business, tax, accounting, finance, audit, risk, compliance and healthcare rely on Wolters Kluwer's market leading information-enabled tools and software solutions to manage their business efficiently, deliver results to their clients, and succeed in an ever more dynamic world.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2014 annual revenues of €3.7 billion. The group serves customers in over 170 countries, and employs over 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands. Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on NYSE Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY).

For more information about our products and organization, visit http://www.wolterskluwerhealth.com, follow @WKHealth or @Wolters_Kluwer on Twitter, like us on Facebook, follow us on LinkedIn, or follow WoltersKluwerComms on YouTube.

Wolters Kluwer Health

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