Nav: Home

HRT prevents osteoarthritis

March 12, 2001

Users of oestrogen replacement therapy have more knee cartilage than non-users 2001;60:332-6

Long term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) seems to protect women from osteoarthritis of the knee, finds a study in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It most often occurs in hip and knee joints, where loss of the tissue which prevents joint friction¾cartilage¾exposes the bone underneath. Osteoarthritis is more common in women than in men.

Eighty one women took part in the study. All were over 50 and postmenopausal. Forty two of the women had used HRT for five years or more; 39 had never used it. Imaging was used to measure the amount of cartilage remaining in the knee joints.

After accounting for bone size, smoking, exercise, weight and age at menopause, all factors influencing cartilage volume, the researchers found a significant difference between users and non-users of HRT. Cartilage volume was almost 8 per cent greater in women who had been using HRT for five years or more.

The authors conclude that HRT may protect against the development of osteoarthritis by preserving the knee cartilage. Previous research shows that oestrogen receptors are present in normal joints, suggesting that depletion of the hormone may affect the normal working of the joint.
-end-
Contact:

Professor Flavia Cicuttini, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Alfred Hospital, Victoria, Australia.

BMJ Specialty Journals

Related Osteoarthritis Articles:

App helps reduce osteoarthritis pain
By performing a few simple physical exercises daily, and receiving information about their disease regularly, 500 osteoarthritis patients were able to on average halve their pain in 6 months -- and improve their physical function.
Osteoarthritis can increase your risk for social isolation
In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers examined information from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) study.
High rates of opioid prescriptions for osteoarthritis
Opioids work against severe pain but the risks of side effects and addiction are high.
Disease burden in osteoarthritis is similar to rheumatoid arthritis
Osteoarthritis (OA) has traditionally been viewed as a highly prevalent but milder condition when compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and some may believe that it is part of a normal aging process requiring acceptance, not treatment.
3D printing may help treat osteoarthritis
In a Journal of Orthopaedic Research study, scientists used 3D printing to repair bone in the joints of mini-pigs, an advance that may help to treat osteoarthritis in humans.
Finger joint enlargements may be linked to knee osteoarthritis
Heberden's nodes (HNs) are bony enlargements of the finger joints that are readily detectable in a routine physical exam and are considered hallmarks of osteoarthritis.
Hormone therapy may be best defense against knee osteoarthritis
There is an ongoing debate regarding the relationship between knee osteoarthritis and hormone therapy (HT), with small-scale studies providing mixed results.
Going from negative to positive in the treatment of osteoarthritis
A scientific team has designed a charged molecule that improved the delivery of osteoarthritis drugs to knee joint cartilage in rodent models of the debilitating joint disorder.
Antioxidant defender protects against osteoarthritis
A protein involved in multiple cellular processes called ANP32A protects cartilage in the joints against degradation by damaging oxidation, preventing the development and progression of osteoarthritis, according to a new study by Frederique Cornelis and colleagues.
Symptoms of osteoarthritis lessened with simple changes to the diet
One gram of fish oil a day could help reduce the pain of patients with osteoarthritis, a new study in Rheumatology reports.
More Osteoarthritis News and Osteoarthritis Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Making Amends
What makes a true apology? What does it mean to make amends for past mistakes? This hour, TED speakers explore how repairing the wrongs of the past is the first step toward healing for the future. Guests include historian and preservationist Brent Leggs, law professor Martha Minow, librarian Dawn Wacek, and playwright V (formerly Eve Ensler).
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.