Nav: Home

The price paid for higher energy is highly dangerous to teeth

March 12, 2008

CHICAGO (March 12, 2008) - For more than 10 years, energy drinks in the United States have been on the rise, promising consumers more "oomph" in their day. In fact, it is estimated that the energy drink market will hit $10 billion by 2010. While that may be great news for energy drink companies, it could mean a different story for the oral health of consumers who sometimes daily rely on these drinks for that extra boost.

Previous scientific research findings have helped to warn consumers that the pH (potential of hydrogen) levels in beverages such as soda could lead to tooth erosion, the breakdown of tooth structure caused by the effect of acid on the teeth that leads to decay. The studies revealed that, whether diet or regular, ice tea or root beer, the acidity level in popular beverages that consumers drink every day contributes to the erosion of enamel.

However, in a recent study that appears in the November/December 2007 issue of General Dentistry, the Academy of General Dentistry's (AGD) clinical, peer reviewed journal, the pH level of soft drinks isn't the only factor that causes dental erosion. A beverage's "buffering capacity," or the ability to neutralize acid, plays a significant role in the cause of dental erosion.

The study examined the acidity levels of five popular beverages on the market. The results proved that popular "high energy" and sports drinks had the highest mean buffering capacity, resulting in the strongest potential for erosion of enamel.

According to the study, the popularity of energy drinks is on the rise, especially among adolescents and young adults. Their permanent teeth are more susceptible to attack from the acids found in soft drinks, due to the porous quality of their immature tooth enamel. As a result, there is high potential for erosion among this age demographic to increase.

In fact, Raymond Martin, DDS, MAGD, AGD spokesperson, says he treats more patients in their teens to 20s for tooth erosion. "They drink a great deal more sodas, sports drinks, and energy drinks," he says. "The results, if not treated early and if extensive, can lead to very severe dental issues that would require full mouth rehabilitation to correct," says Dr. Martin.

Drink responsibly for your oral health:
  • Use a straw positioned at the back of the mouth so that the liquid avoids the teeth
  • Rinse the mouth with water after drinking acidic beverages
  • Limit the intake of sodas, sports drinks and energy drinks

-end-


Academy of General Dentistry

Related Consumers Articles:

What's in a name? For young Chinese consumers, it's about culture mixing
Younger, more cosmopolitan Chinese consumers tend to favor brand translations that keep both the sound and the meaning of the original name, says U. of I. business professor and branding expert Carlos J.
Why do consumers participate in 'green' programs?
From recycling to reusing hotel towels, consumers who participate in a company's 'green' program are more satisfied with its service, finds a new study co-led by a Michigan State University researcher.
Consumers care about carbon footprint
How much do consumers care about the carbon footprint of the products they buy?
Consumers have huge environmental impact
You won't make big cuts in your environmental impact by taking shorter showers or turning out the lights.
Consumers' preferences for foliage plant attributes
Experiments investigated the effect of plant attributes on consumers' likelihood of purchasing indoor foliage plants.
New study finds adult fresh pear consumers had a lower body weight than non-pear consumers
The epidemiologic study, led by Carol O'Neil of the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, used a nationally representative analytic sample to examine the association of fresh pear consumption with nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, diet quality, and cardiovascular risk factors in adults.
How much do consumers know about new sunscreen labels?
Sunscreen labels may still be confusing to consumers, with only 43 percent of those surveyed understanding the definition of the sun protection factor value, according to the results of a small study published in a research letter online by JAMA Dermatology.
Saving money: Do consumers spend less if they think about the future?
Why is it so hard for consumers to save money?
When are consumers more likely to rely on feelings to make decisions?
Why do some consumers make choices based on their feelings instead of rational assessments?
How are ordinary consumers transforming the fashion business?
One of the most important shifts of the 21st century is the ability of consumers to participate in markets they love such as music and fashion.

Related Consumers Reading:

A Consumers' Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America
by Lizabeth Cohen (Author)

In this signal work of history, Bancroft Prize winner and Pulitzer Prize finalist Lizabeth Cohen shows how the pursuit of prosperity after World War II fueled our pervasive consumer mentality and transformed American life.

Trumpeted as a means to promote the general welfare, mass consumption quickly outgrew its economic objectives and became synonymous with patriotism, social equality, and the American Dream. Material goods came to embody the promise of America, and the power of consumers to purchase everything from vacuum cleaners to convertibles gave rise to the power of citizens to... View Details


Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having, and Being (11th Edition)
by Michael R. Solomon (Author)

&>For undergraduate and MBA courses in consumer behavior.

 

Solomon goes beyond the discussion of why people buy things and explores how products, services, and consumption activities contribute to shape people’s social experiences.

 

This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience—for you and your students. Here’s how:

Improve Results with MyMarketingLab: MyMarketingLab delivers proven results in... View Details


Consumer Behavior: Building Marketing Strategy
by David L Mothersbaugh Associate Professor of Marketing (Author), Delbert I Hawkins Dr (Author)

Consumer Behavior: Building Marketing Strategy builds on theory to provide students with a usable, strategic understanding of consumer behavior that acknowledges recent changes in internal and external influences, global marketing environments, and the discipline overall. Updated with strategy-based examples from an author team with a deep understanding of each principle's business applications, current and classic examples of both text and visual advertisements throughout the text will serve to engage students and bring the material to life. The 13th edition of Mothersbaugh/Hawkins is... View Details


Consumer Behavior
by Wayne D. Hoyer (Author), Deborah J. MacInnis (Author), Rik Pieters (Author)

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR combines a foundation in key concepts from marketing, psychology, sociology, and anthropology with a highly practical focus on real-world applications for today's business environment. The new edition of this popular, pioneering text incorporates the latest cutting-edge research and current business practices, including extensive coverage of social media influences, increased consumer power, emerging neuroscience findings, and emotion in consumer decision making. In addition, the Sixth Edition includes an increased emphasis on social responsibility and ethics in marketing.... View Details


Consumer Reports Buying Guide 2018
by Consumer Reports Editorial Staff (Author)

Consumer Reports Buying Guide 2018 for Cars, TV's, Ranges, Refrigerators, Laptops, Vacuums, Smartphones, Gas Grills and More. View Details


Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having, and Being (12th Edition)
by Michael R. Solomon (Author)

For courses in Consumer Behavior.

 

Beyond Consumer Behavior: How Buying Habits Shape Identity

Solomon’s Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having, and Being deepens the study of consumer behavior into an investigation of how having (or not having) certain products affects our lives. Solomon looks at how possessions influence how we feel about ourselves and each other, especially in the canon of social media and the digital age.

View Details


A Consumer's Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients, 7th Edition: Complete Information About the Harmful and Desirable Ingredients Found in Cosmetics and Cosmeceuticals
by Ruth Winter (Author)

Everything you need to know about the safety and efficacy of cosmetics and cosmeceuticals.

Is it a cosmetic? A drug? A nutrient? It’s becoming more and more difficult to tell the difference with the cosmetic companies combining the three. And unlike with food additives, the FDA has little control over what goes into the products that claim to make you look more beautiful–even though cosmeceuticals (cosmetics that purport to have druglike benefits) have skyrocketed into a multibillion-dollar industry.

So before you slather on that “wrinkle-reducing” cream or swallow a... View Details


American Consumer Society, 1865 - 2005: From Hearth to HDTV
by Regina Lee Blaszczyk (Author)

This startlingly original and highly readable volume adds a new richness and depth to an element of U.S. history that is all too often taken for granted. In American Consumer Society, Regina Lee Blaszczyk examines the emergence of consumerism in the Victorian era, and, in tracing its evolution over the next 140 years, shows how the emergence of a mass market was followed by its fragmentation. Niche marketing focused on successive waves of new consumers as each made its presence known: Irish immigrants, urban African Americans, teenagers, computer geeks, and soccer moms, to name but a... View Details


Ads, Fads, and Consumer Culture: Advertising's Impact on American Character and Society
by Arthur Asa Berger San Francisco State University (Author)

The fifth edition of this approachable text draws on both academic and applied perspectives to offer a lively critique of contemporary advertising’s effects on American character and culture.

Berger explains how advertising works by employing a psycho-cultural approach, encouraging readers to think about advertisements and commercials in more analytical and profound ways. Among the topics he addresses are the role of brands, the problem of self-alienation, and how both relate to consumption. Berger also considers the Values and Lifestyle (VALS) and Claritas typologies in... View Details


A Consumer's Dictionary of Food Additives, 7th Edition: Descriptions in Plain English of More Than 12,000 Ingredients Both Harmful and Desirable Found in Foods
by Ruth Winter (Author)

An Essential Household Reference…Revised and Updated

With our culture’s growing interest in organic foods and healthy eating, it is important to understand what food labels mean and to learn how to read between the lines. This completely revised and updated edition of A Consumer’s Dictionary of Food Additives gives you the facts about the safety and side effects of more than 12,000 ingredients–such as preservatives, food-tainting pesticides, and animal drugs–that end up in food as a result of processing and curing. It tells you what’s safe
and what you should... View Details

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Confronting Stigma
Why do we harshly judge certain behaviors or conditions, making it harder to talk honestly about them? This hour, TED speakers confront stigmas around addiction, depression, HIV and sex work. Guests include journalist Johann Hari, TV/film producer and mental health advocate Nikki Webber Allen, HIV awareness educator Arik Hartmann, and sex worker and activist Juno Mac.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#461 Adhesives
This week we're discussing glue from two very different times. We speak with Dr. Jianyu Li about his research into a new type of medical adhesive. And Dr. Geeske Langejans explains her work making and investigating Stone Age and Paleolithic glues.