18th annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction & Embryology (ESHRE)

March 13, 2002

Controversy surrounds the whole field of reproductive medicine. Every month brings announcements of research developments or new rulings by regulatory bodies - often sparking heated debate among doctors and scientists themselves as well as ethicists, legislators, the media and the public.

ESHRE'S annual meeting (Vienna Centre, Austria 30 June-3 July 2002)is the forum where many of the world's leading experts in reproductive medicine gather to give the first public presentation of their latest research findings and to discuss issues that are presenting law-makers and ethicists with some of the most challenging problems and difficult decisions currently facing society.

We welcome the media to the meeting. Every session is open to journalists and registration is free. A media centre with computers, fax, photocopying and free local and international telephone facilities and internet connections will be available.

English, French and German-speaking press office staff will be on hand to assist you. But, please note: the official conference language is English.

To register: fax form (with a photocopy of your press credentials) to:
Margaret Willson
Fax: +44 (0) 1536 772191

Form can be downloaded from the ESHRE website: http://www.eshre.com/ecm/main.asp?lan=10&typ=150 or obtained from Margaret Willson

European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

Related Reproductive Medicine Articles from Brightsurf:

When reproductive rights are less restrictive, babies are born healthier
American women living in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies are less likely to give birth to low-birth weight babies, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier.

Partner selection ultimately happens in the woman's reproductive tract
The female reproductive tract has the final say in human mate choice, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland.

Vagabonding female butterflies weigh in on reproductive strategies
A new study by researchers from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bengaluru, published today in the Royal Society's journal Biology Letters, shows that dispersals, when undertaken by butterflies in search of unpredictable resources, selectively burden the egg-carrying females on their long flights.

Immune functions traded in for reproductive success
Researchers at the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg, Germany, and the University of Washington in Seattle, USA, for the first time, investigate the phenomenon of sexual parasitism in deep-sea anglerfish.

Research reverses the reproductive clock in mice
Researchers have lifted fertility rates in older female mice with small doses of a metabolic compound that reverses the ageing process in eggs, offering hope for some women struggling to conceive.

NUS Medicine researchers can reprogramme cells to original state for regenerative medicine
Scientists from NUS Medicine have found a way to induce totipotency in embryonic cells that have already matured into pluripotency.

What we're learning about the reproductive microbiome
Most research has focused on the oral, skin, and gut microbiomes, but bacteria, viruses, and fungi living within our reproductive systems may also affect sperm quality, fertilization, embryo implantation, and other aspects of conception and reproduction.

Operating room reproductive hazards for female surgeons
Researchers in this review article discuss occupational reproductive hazardsĀ for female surgeons in the operating room, including radiation exposure, surgical smoke, working conditions and physical demands, sharps injuries, anesthetic gases and the use of toxic agents.

The reproductive function of the clitoris
A recent review published in Clinical Anatomy highlights evidence that the female clitoris is important for reproduction.

Do magazines exaggerate fertility at advanced reproductive age?
A new study has shown that popular magazines commonly feature older pregnant celebrities on their covers with no mention of the risks of advanced maternal age pregnancy or the advanced reproductive technologies and methods needed to achieve these pregnancies.

Read More: Reproductive Medicine News and Reproductive Medicine Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.