Main federal disaster relief law has fallen behind modern threat levels, NYU professor finds

March 13, 2009

In new research published in the Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, New York University Professor Mitchell Moss explains that the cornerstone Federal disaster relief legislation, the Robert T. Stafford Act, is dangerously out of date, and must be reformed to provide for rapid relief after a catastrophe.

Two years after Hurricane Katrina, and six years after the September 11 attacks, the Federal government still lacks the legal authority to provide rapid financial assistance to residents, small businesses and municipal governments following a major disaster, according to the Journal article (Vol. 6 : Issue 1, Article 13, January 2009).

Moss, professor of urban policy and planning at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at NYU, faults the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act for: Moss recommends that Congress: "It is time for Congress to strengthen the nation's capacity to respond to the catastrophes that we face in the twenty-first century," writes Professor Moss. "We face serious threats of biological, chemical, radiological and nuclear attacks that require fundamental reform of the Stafford Act. The time for action is now; we must create a new set of policies that can protect the nation from the risks of the modern era."

The research was conducted under the auspices of New York University's Center for Catastrophe Preparedness and Response (CCPR). CCPR Director Brad Penuel underscored the importance of Professor Moss' work.

"CCPR's report is a significant contribution to the dialogue on making America safer in times of catastrophe, be it from a natural event or one derived from human actions. I applaud the findings of this report and Professor Moss for highlighting the role academia can play in understanding politically and socially complex issues like disaster preparedness and response," he said.
-end-
The full report is available at http://www.nyu.edu/ccpr/.

New York University

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