First successful transvaginal nephrectomy performed using advanced surgical concepts' tri-port

March 13, 2009

CARACAS, VENEZUELA - March 13, 2009 - Dr. Rene Sotelo is pleased to announce the world's first successful live human transvaginal nephrectomy using the Tri-port multi-channel port supplied by Advanced Surgical Concepts Ltd. This ground breaking surgery was performed by Dr. Sotelo and his team at the Instituto Medico La Floresta in Caracas, Venezuela on March 7, 2009. The majority of the intra-operative endoscopic visualization and tissue mobilization for the natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) nephrectomy was performed transvaginally, with observation and occasional assistance from an intra-umbilical Tri-port. No extra-umbilical incisions were needed.

The patient was a 65 year-old female with a 6 cm left kidney tumor and a prior history of hysterectomy. The operation lasted 220 minutes followed by a two day hospital stay. The patient experienced no complications and was discharged from the hospital with no visible abdominal scar. Today, six days post-operative, the patient continues to do well in excellent recovery.

Dr. Sotelo remarks, "This concept of using the Tri-port for transvaginal NOTES nephrectomy was first described in a cadaveric study presented at the World Congress of Endurourology in 2008 by Drs. Monish Aron, Mihir Desai, and Inderbir Gill. I sought their advice and collaboration in our operation. The procedure went well and has great potential for the future."
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Instituto Medico La Floresta

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