Nav: Home

Prevent antibiotic resistances from spreading: Rapid test helps administering the 'correct' drug

March 13, 2018

Scientists of the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technologies (Leibniz-IPHT), Center for Sepsis Control and Care at the University Hospital Jena and Friedrich Schiller University work at a faster and cheaper alternative for hitherto time consuming pathogen diagnostics. Project manager Prof. Ute Neugebauer illustrates the advantages of this new approach: "We combine light-based analytical methods with microfluidic sample processing. With our Lab-on-a-Chip system, thus a miniaturised lab, we are able to clearly identify bacterial strains and their resistances, in less than three hours".

Standard practices for the infectious diagnostics require up to 72 hours to allow for a reliable result. This is due to the fact, that the number of pathogens in a patients sample is too small to conduct tests. Analysis is therefore only possible after time-consuming cultivation. Especially in clinical application during treatments of severe infections e.g. a sepsis time is a crucial factor. Intensive physicians are confronted with an alarming dilemma: "far too often we have to administer broad-spectrum antibiotics 'blindly', because we can neither analyse pathogen nor potential resistances. Therefore, we possibly use a sledge-hammer to crack a nut. A vicious cycle that aides the development of new resistances", explains Prof. Michael Bauer, director of the Clinic of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care at the University Hospital Jena.

The new method out of Jena provides much faster diagnosis as basis for a decision of a reliable therapy. Ute Neugebauer, who works at Leibniz-IPHT and the University Hospital Jena points to tiny electrodes that are fixed on the surface of a stamp-sized chip: "Electric fields secure bacteria in a very small area". Jena's scientists then apply various antibiotics in different concentrations on the trapped bacteria and examine them with Raman spectroscopy. "This means that we irradiate the pathogens with laser light and evaluate the scattered light spectrum", describes Neugebauer the method.

Prof. Jürgen Popp, director of the Leibniz-IPHT and head of the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, explains: "After two hours we can already detect distinct changes in the Raman spectra. Out of these, we can derive wether the strain is resistant or sensible. At the same time we get information on the needed concentration of the antibiotic to constrain bacterial growth. This is an important diagnostic parameter that influences the success of a treatment decidedly", Popp continues. The results of the team of chemists, physicians, and biologists were published in the current edition of the renowned journal Analytical Chemistry, which was released in February 2018.

The combination of fast, light-based diagnostics and a high automation level reduces the time from sampling to result from to date 72 to three and a half hours. "Such a fast procedure could revolutionise diagnostics of infectious diseases", Prof. Bettina Löffler, director of the Institute of Medical Microbiology at the University Hospital Jena, is sure about that. Currently, researchers work at a platform for the application in hospitals. Another, more far reaching, aim is the further development into a catridge-based rapid test system, which will enable general practitioners to identify resistances in a fast and easy way for the first time. Thereby, physicians would hold a powerful tool, from which they could benefit in personalised therapy, this means the administration of a fitting drug.
-end-
The research was funded by the European Union, the Federal Ministry for Education and Research, the Free State of Thuringia, and the Carl-Zeiss-Foundation.

Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology

Related Antibiotics Articles:

Antibiotics promote resistance on experimental croplands
Canadian researchers have generated both novel and existing antibiotic resistance mechanisms on experimental farmland, by exposing the soil to specific antibiotics.
Why antibiotics fail
UCSB biologists correct a flaw in the way bacterial susceptibility to these drugs is tested.
Fungi have enormous potential for new antibiotics
Fungi are a potential goldmine for the production of pharmaceuticals.
Antibiotics can boost bacterial reproduction
The growth of bacteria can be stimulated by antibiotics, scientists at the University of Exeter have discovered.
Last-line antibiotics are failing
The ECDC's latest data on antimicrobial resistance and consumption shows that in 2015, antibiotic resistance continued to increase for most bacteria and antibiotics under surveillance.
Two antibiotics fight bacteria differently than thought
Two widely prescribed antibiotics -- chloramphenicol and linezolid -- may fight bacteria in a different way from what scientists and doctors thought for years, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have found.
Preserving the power of antibiotics
News release describes efforts to address inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in emergency departments and urgent-care centers nationwide, which a JAMA study published this past May found rates as high as 50 percent for acute respiratory infections in US emergency departments.
Antibiotics could be cut by up to one-third, say dairy farmers
Nine in 10 dairy farmers participating in a new survey from the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers (RADBF) say that the farming industry must take a proactive lead in the battle against antibiotic resistance.
Antibiotics may be inappropriate for uncomplicated diverticulitis
Antibiotics are advised in most guidelines on diverticulitis, which arises when one or more small pouches in the digestive tract become inflamed or infected.
New book on Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance from CSHLPress
'Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance' from CSHLPress examines the major classes of antibiotics, together with their modes of action and mechanisms of resistance.

Related Antibiotics Reading:

Antibiotics Simplified
by Jason C. Gallagher (Author), Conan MacDougall (Author)

EMRA Antibiotic Guide, 17th Edition
by MD Brian J. Levine (Author)

Antibiotic Basics for Clinicians: The ABCs of Choosing the Right Antibacterial Agent
by Alan R. Hauser MD PhD (Author)

Ciprofloxacin: Ultimate treatment of bacterial infection like Skin Infection, UTI and Joint Infection
by Zardi Call (Author)

Herbal Antibiotics, 2nd Edition: Natural Alternatives for Treating Drug-resistant Bacteria
by Stephen Harrod Buhner (Author)

Azithromycin: Magical Pills That Cure Bacterial Infections Like Lime Disease, Chlamydia, Sinus Infections, Anthrax, Reproductive Organ And Malaria.
by Awate Simon (Author)

Ciprofloxacin: Perfect Medication On An Antibiotic That Fights Bacteria Infections Such As Sinuses, Skin Infection, Uti, Joint Infection, Diarrhea, And Typhoid Fever.
by Larry Y. Bostrom (Author)

Antibiotics: Challenges, Mechanisms, Opportunities
by Christopher Walsh (Author), Timothy Wencewicz (Author)

Azithromycin: Active Antibiotics Pills that Eliminates Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, STD, UTI, Pneumonia, Bronchitis, Sinusitis, & Bacterial Infections of the Ear, Stomach, Tooth, & Skin
by Christine R. Funke (Author)

How To Survive In A World Without Antibiotics: A top MD shares safe alternatives that work, some better than antibiotics
by Keith Scott-Mumby (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Dying Well
Is there a way to talk about death candidly, without fear ... and even with humor? How can we best prepare for it with those we love? This hour, TED speakers explore the beauty of life ... and death. Guests include lawyer Jason Rosenthal, humorist Emily Levine, banker and travel blogger Michelle Knox, mortician Caitlin Doughty, and entrepreneur Lux Narayan.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#492 Flint Water Crisis
This week we dig into the Flint water crisis: what happened, how it got so bad, what turned the tide, what's still left to do, and the mix of science, politics, and activism that are still needed to finish pulling Flint out of the crisis. We spend the hour with Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha, a physician, scientist, activist, the founder and director of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, and author of the book "What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City".