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Pioneering research on mechanistic basis of disease in new journal Systems Medicine

March 13, 2018

New Rochelle, NY, March 13, 2018--The new peer-reviewed journal, Systems Medicine, has launched with a powerful mission to capture the leading research in the emerging field of medical systems biology. A fascinating Roundtable Discussion with key opinion leaders on the importance of systems medicine and interviews with thought leaders highlight the debut of Systems Medicine, a new open access journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The articles are available on the Systems Medicine website.

Co-Editors-in-Chief Harald H.H.W. Schmidt, MD, PhD, PharmD, Maastricht University, The Netherlands and Jan Baumbach, PhD, Technical University of Munich, Germany, discuss why the current approach to treating disease fails to drive successful new drug development in their Editorial entitled, "The End of Medicine as We Know It: Introduction to the New Journal, Systems Medicine." Modern omics technology is providing a new way to look at diseases and, combined with advanced molecular tools, a deeper understanding of systems biology, and big data, is enabling new mechanistic definitions of disease.

In an insightful Roundtable Discussion moderated by Dr. Schmidt, the expert panel examines the differences between systems medicine and current medicine and share their views on how systems medicine can help solve some of the problems plaguing classical medicine. Roundtable participants Jan Baumbach, Joseph Loscalzo, Alvar Agusti, Edwin Silverman, and Vasco Azevedo explore how an emphasis on molecular mechanistic biomarkers will help drive major innovations in new drug discovery and the development of novel preventive therapies based on research into the trajectories of healthy aging.

Newly published in Systems Medicine are interviews with two thought leaders on systems medicine: Charles Auffray, PhD, President, European Institute for Systems Biology & Medicine and Chair of the Executive Board, European Association of Systems Medicine, and Weiniu Gan, PhD, Program Director, Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, U.S. National Institutes of Health.
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About the Journal

Systems Medicine: Journal of Medical Systems Biology and Network Medicine is the premier open access, peer-reviewed journal focused on interdisciplinary approaches to exploiting the power of big data by applying systems biology and network medicine. Led by Co-Editors-in-Chief H.H.H.W. Schmidt, MD, PhD, PharmD, Maastricht University, and Jan Baumbach, PhD, Technical University of Munich, Germany, Systems Medicine yields major breakthroughs towards mechanism-based re-definitions of diseases for high-precision diagnostics and treatments. The Journal is collaborative partners with the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST), Italian Association for Systems Medicine and Healthcare (ASSIMSS), and European Association for Systems Medicine (EASYM). Complete tables of content can be viewed on the Systems Medicine website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Assay and Drug Development Technologies, Big Data, and OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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