Nav: Home

Medical students, burnout and alcohol

March 14, 2016

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Medical students are more prone to alcohol abuse than their peers not attending medical school, especially if they are young, single and under a high debt load. That's according to a study on medical student burnout by researchers at Mayo Clinic. The findings appear in the journal Academic Medicine.

"Our findings clearly show there is reason for concern," says Liselotte Dyrbye, M.D., Mayo Clinic internist and senior author of the paper. "We recommend institutions pursue a multifaceted solution to address related issues with burnout, the cost of medical education and alcohol abuse."

Mayo researchers surveyed 12,500 medical students, and one-third of those students responded. Approximately 1,400 of that subgroup experienced clinical alcohol abuse or dependence. Nationally, that translates to about one-third of those responding, compared to only 16 percent of peers not in medical school, and double the rate of alcohol abuse or dependence of surgeons, U.S. physicians or the general public based on earlier research by this team.

Burnout factors such as emotional exhaustion or feelings of depersonalization were all highly associated with alcohol abuse or dependence among the medical students. Three other factors were independently associated:
  • A younger age than most peers in medical school
  • Being unmarried
  • Amount of educational debt
No statistical difference was found between differing years of medical school or between men and women.

Researchers say the average cost of medical school from 1995 to 2014 increased by 209 percent at private colleges and 286 percent at public schools. They say physicians graduating with a medical degree in 2014 had an average of $180,000 in educational debt.

"In our paper we recommend wellness curricula for medical schools, identifying and remediating factors within the learning environment contributing to stress, and removal of barriers to mental health services," says first author and Mayo Medical School student Eric Jackson.
-end-
Other co-authors include Tait Shanafelt, M.D., Omar Hasan, M.B.B.S., and Daniel Satele, of Mayo Clinic. The research was funded by the American Medical Association and Mayo Clinic.

About Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Mayo Clinic

Related Alcohol Abuse Articles:

Alcohol abuse even before pregnancy may harm offspring
Mothers who binge drink before they become pregnant may be more likely to have children with high blood sugar and other changes in glucose function that increase their risk of developing diabetes as adults, according to a new study conducted in rats.
Rewards treat alcohol abuse in those with mental illness
Researchers at Washington State University have shown that offering prizes- - from simple shampoo to DVD players -- can be an effective, low-cost treatment for alcohol abuse, the nation's third leading preventable cause of death.
Alcohol abuse increases risk of heart conditions as much as other risk factors
Alcohol abuse increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, heart attack and congestive heart failure as much as other well-established risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and obesity, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Neuroscientist studies connection between PTSD and alcohol abuse
MUSC Psychologist Justin Gass believes repeated alcohol exposure stregthens the connections between neurons in the brain responsible for storing traumatic memories.
Telephone-based intervention shows promise in combating alcohol abuse among soldiers
Researchers at the University of Washington tested a telephone-based intervention for military members struggling with alcohol abuse, with promising results.
Abuse of alcohol and/or illicit drugs is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in later life
New research published at this year's International Early Psychosis Association meeting in Milan, Italy, (Oct.
Alcohol abuse drug can be repurposed to treat a blinding disorder
Disulfiram prevents scars forming in a mouse model of scarring conjunctivitis.
Involvement in traditional dating abuse increases chances of cyberdating abuse in teens
New findings from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston revealed that teens who are involved in dating abuse -- as either the perpetrator or the victim -- are more likely to also be involved in cyberdating abuse.
Alcohol abuse may predict congestive heart failure; even among younger adults
Alcohol abuse was associated with a 70 percent increased risk of congestive heart failure in adults and the link was especially strong among younger adults (60 years or younger) and those without high blood pressure, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015.
In females, childhood head injury could lead to alcohol abuse later in life
Girls who suffer a concussive bump on the head in childhood could be at increased risk for abusing alcohol as adults, a new study suggests.

Related Alcohol Abuse Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".