Nav: Home

The chemistry of redheads (video)

March 14, 2017

WASHINGTON, March 14, 2017 -- St. Patrick's Day evokes thoughts of all things often associated with the Irish -- including red hair. Chemically speaking, what sets redheads apart from the crowd is pigmentation -- specifically melanins. Most humans produce the brown-black eumelanin that results in varying shades of skin color and hair from blonde to black. Redheads have a genetic variant that causes cells to produce instead reddish pheomelanin, resulting in pale skin and fiery locks. How red hair is produced by redheads' cells might also explain why they have different sensitivity to pain.Watch the latest Reactions video here: https://youtu.be/Ylt_p2zzONw.
-end-
Reactions is a video series produced by the American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios. Subscribe to the series at http://bit.ly/ACSReactions, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions to be the first to see our latest videos.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. The American Chemical Society does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us: TwitterFacebook

American Chemical Society

Related Pigmentation Articles:

Skin cancer risk in athletes: The dangers of ultraviolet radiation
The dangers of ultraviolet radiation exposure, which most often comes from the sun, are well-known.
The making of 'Fancy Mouse'
For the past few hundred years, the colorful hair and unique patterns of the so-called 'Fancy Mouse' have made them the stars of pet shows in Japan and beyond.
Body plan evolution not as simple as once believed
Hox gene do not work alone to determine the layout of vertebrae, limbs and other body parts.
Topical cream shows promise in treatment of skin pigmentation disease, vitiligo
A nationwide phase II clinical trial, coordinated out of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, has found that a topical cream was extremely effective in reversing the effects of vitiligo, a relatively common autoimmune disease that causes loss of skin pigmentation.
How a member of a family of light-sensitive proteins adjusts skin color
A team of Brown University researchers found that opsin 3 -- a protein closely related to rhodopsin, the protein that enables low-light vision -- has a role in adjusting the amount of pigment produced in human skin, a determinant of skin color.
More Pigmentation News and Pigmentation Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...