Nav: Home

Location of spinal correction influences risk of PJK development

March 14, 2017

The surgical correction of adult spinal deformities often involves realigning the lower portion of the spine, or the 'lumbar' spine. Yet despite significant advances in spinal surgery, modifying the curvature of the lower spine through surgical fusion increases the risk of abnormal spinal curvature above the level of the operation, a condition called proximal junctional kyphosis - or PJK.

A new study reports for the first time that PJK risk following lumbar spinal fusion depends on the level of the spine fused. Specifically, the authors - who include members of the International Spine Study Group (ISSG) from multiple academic centers - found that fusing the lower portion of lumbar spine results in a decreased risk of PJK. The results were presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting on March 14 in San Diego, California.

In the study, 350 adult patients who had undergone fusion of their lumbar spine spinal abnormalities were divided into those who had developed PJK following their procedures and those who did not. The specific vertebrae fused in their surgeries were then compared, revealing to the authors that more dramatic spinal fusions - those higher up along the spine - may increase the risk of developing PJK.

"This study is unique in the sense that it looks at a very common problem, currently intensively studied around the world, and examines this challenge through an innovative method," says investigator Frank Schwab, MD, chief of the Spine Service at Hospital for Special Surgery.

Dr. Schwab also points out that while numerous theories on PJK risk have been put forth over the years, few orthopedic centers have had enough data or resources to adequately study it.

"Our findings give us a substantial boost in shifting the discussion from expert opinion to a more evidence-based conclusion," he says, "Additionally, they also offer a pragmatic solution that can be applied right away in order to reduce PJK rates."
-end-
About Hospital for Special Surgery

Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) is the world's largest academic medical center focused on musculoskeletal health. HSS is nationally ranked No. 1 in orthopedics and No. 2 in rheumatology by U.S. News & World Report (2016-2017), and is the first hospital in New York State to receive Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Service from the American Nurses Credentialing Center four consecutive times. HSS has one of the lowest infection rates in the country. HSS is an affiliate of Weill Cornell Medical College and as such all Hospital for Special Surgery medical staff are faculty of Weill Cornell. The hospital's research division is internationally recognized as a leader in the investigation of musculoskeletal and autoimmune diseases. Hospital for Special Surgery is located in New York City and online at http://www.hss.edu.

Hospital for Special Surgery

Related Risk Articles:

Risk of HIV-related heart disease risk varies by geography, income
People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to people without HIV.
Genetic study provides most comprehensive map of risk to date of breast cancer risk
A major international study of the genetics of breast cancer has identified more than 350 DNA 'errors' that increase an individual's risk of developing the disease.
New risk scores help physicians provide better care for high-risk pulmonary patients, study finds
Study of more than 17,000 patients finds new laboratory-based method of estimating outcomes for patients with a severe pulmonary disorder that has no cure can help physicians better provide proper care, referrals, and services for patients at the end of life.
Researchers develop model to predict suicide risk in at-risk young adults
New research from Pitt's School of Medicine shows that fluctuation and severity of depressive symptoms are much better at predicting risk of suicidal behavior in at-risk young adults.
High-risk sexually transmitted HPV virus associated with increased CVD risk
Infection with high-risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which have been linked to cancer, might increase the risk of heart and blood vessel or cardiovascular disease, especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors.
Radiation therapy cuts low risk of recurrence by nearly 3/4 for patients with 'good risk'
A subset of patients with low-risk breast cancer is highly unlikely to see cancer return following breast conservation surgery but can lower that risk even further with radiation therapy, finds a new long-term clinical trial report.
Erectile dysfunction means increased risk for heart disease, regardless of other risk factors
Men with erectile dysfunction are at greater risk for heart attacks, strokes and sudden cardiac death.
Innovative risk score tool effectively predicts future risk of hospitalization for COPD patients
Researchers have developed a new tool that utilizes basic laboratory tests to effectively identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who are at high risk of being hospitalized due to a flare up of the condition.
Study finds new combined risk score more effectively predicts stroke risk in Afib patients
New study finds that integrating two separate clinical risk score models more accurately assesses the stroke risk of patients with Afib.
Is sickle cell trait genetic risk factor for increased stroke risk?
Sickle cell trait may not be associated with the occurrence of ischemic stroke (when a blood clot blocks a blood vessel in the brain) in African-Americans, according to a meta-analysis that combined the results of four studies with 19,464 African-American participants.
More Risk News and Risk Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.