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William Small, Jr., M.D., editor of new edition of classic radiation oncology textbook

March 14, 2017

MAYWOOD, IL - William Small, Jr., MD, chair of Loyola Medicine's radiation oncology department, is editor of a revised third edition of a classic reference in radiation oncology.

"Clinical Radiation Oncology: Indications, Techniques and Results" will be published this spring by Wiley-Blackwell.

The 928-page text includes the latest developments in the field, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy and proton beam therapy. The textbook also includes two new chapters - "Palliative Radiotherapy" and "Statistics in Radiation Oncology" - a comprehensive head and neck cancer section and treatment algorithms for each tumor.

The first two editions (1988 and 2000) were edited by the legendary Chiu-Chen Wang, MD, of Harvard Medical School. In the third edition, Dr. Small continues Dr. Wang's approach of providing a practical, application-based, comprehensive overview of the biological basis of radiation oncology and the clinical efficacy of radiation therapy. Associate editors are Nancy J. Tarbell, MD, of Harvard Medical School and Min Yao, PhD, of Case Western Reserve University.
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Loyola University Health System

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