Nav: Home

PolyU launches The D. H. Chen Foundation Nobel Laureate Lecture Series

March 14, 2017

In celebration of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU)'s 80th anniversary, we are honoured to launch the PolyU 80th Anniversary The D. H. Chen Foundation Nobel Laureate Lecture Series.

With the generous support from The D. H. Chen Foundation, the Faculty of Applied Science and Textiles (FAST) of PolyU has the honour of inviting Professor Randy W. Schekman, 2013 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine, to kick off the series on 14 March 2017 and present a lecture entitled "RNA sorting and packaging in extracellular vesicles secreted by mammalian cells".

Every day, each cell within our body produces our daily needed protein molecules to support the proper functioning of various organs. Interestingly, approximately 10% of them are transported and secreted out of the cell as cargo in the small packages - called vesicles. These proteins include insulin, hormones, digestive enzymes and neurotransmitters. Such transport system is critical for a variety of physiological processes in which vesicle fusion must be tightly controlled. Without this wonderfully precise organisation, the cell would lapse into chaos resulting in development of different diseases.

By employing a yeast system, Professor Schekman identified a set of genes required for transportation of proteins through and out of the cell in the small vesicles. This discovery has a major impact on our understanding of how cargo is delivered at the right time and at the right place. At the lecture today, he provided novel insight in understanding how defects in this transport system can lead to development of various diseases including diabetes and a number of neurological and immunological disorders, ultimately opening new therapeutic avenues targeting this transport system.

Professor Timothy W. Tong, President of PolyU, said, "Through this lecture series, we hope to bring the bright minds of the Nobel Laureates of different fields to share their insights and perspectives, to spark inspirations in the academic community, and to enlighten our young minds, so that we can bring our research and education to the next level, and eventually make a better world."

Enlighted by Professor Schekman today, audiences had better understanding of this transport system, and also possible new therapeutic options for a variety of human diseases.
-end-
For further information, please visit https://www.polyu.edu.hk/fast/80anniversary/nobel_mar/.

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Related Diseases Articles:

How many rare diseases are there?
Dr. Tudor Oprea says a better method for classifying rare diseases will lead to improved patient care.
A vaccine against chronic inflammatory diseases
In animals, a vaccine modifying the composition and function of the gut microbiota provides protection against the onset of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and certain metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity.
Using gene scissors to detect diseases
Researchers present sensor prototype that can rapidly, precisely, and cost-effectively measure molecular signals for cancer.
Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases.
New, noninvasive test for bowel diseases
Gut diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly prevalent worldwide, especially in industrialized countries.
Cascade exacerbates storage diseases
In rare, hereditary storage diseases such as Sandhoff's disease or Tay-Sachs syndrome, the metabolic waste from accumulating gangliosides cannot be properly disposed of in the nerve cells because important enzymes are missing.
What is known -- and not known -- about heart muscle diseases in children
Cardiomyopathies (heart muscle diseases) in children are the focus of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association that provides insight into the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases as well as identifying future research priorities.
Autoimmune diseases are related to each other, some more than others
Researchers using the world's largest twin registry to study seven autoimmune diseases found the risk of developing the seven diseases is largely inherited, but that some diseases are more closely related than others.
Skin diseases are more common than we think
Skin diseases are ranked as the fourth most common cause of human illness, but many affected people do not consult a physician.
Across diseases, women are diagnosed later than men
When considering all diseases, there are big differences between the course of men's and women's patient care within the Danish healthcare system.
More Diseases News and Diseases Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 3: Shared Immunity
More than a million people have caught Covid-19, and tens of thousands have died. But thousands more have survived and recovered. A week or so ago (aka, what feels like ten years in corona time) producer Molly Webster learned that many of those survivors possess a kind of superpower: antibodies trained to fight the virus. Not only that, they might be able to pass this power on to the people who are sick with corona, and still in the fight. Today we have the story of an experimental treatment that's popping up all over the country: convalescent plasma transfusion, a century-old procedure that some say may become one of our best weapons against this devastating, new disease.   If you have recovered from Covid-19 and want to donate plasma, national and local donation registries are gearing up to collect blood.  To sign up with the American Red Cross, a national organization that works in local communities, head here.  To find out more about the The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project, which we spoke about in our episode, including information on clinical trials or plasma donation projects in your community, go here.  And if you are in the greater New York City area, and want to donate convalescent plasma, head over to the New York Blood Center to sign up. Or, register with specific NYC hospitals here.   If you are sick with Covid-19, and are interested in participating in a clinical trial, or are looking for a plasma donor match, check in with your local hospital, university, or blood center for more; you can also find more information on trials at The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project. And lastly, Tatiana Prowell's tweet that tipped us off is here. This episode was reported by Molly Webster and produced by Pat Walters. Special thanks to Drs. Evan Bloch and Tim Byun, as well as the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.