Nav: Home

VTT has developed stand-up pouches from renewable raw materials and nanocellulose

March 14, 2017

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd has developed lightweight 100% bio-based stand-up pouches with high technical performance. High performance in both oxygen, grease and mineral oil barrier properties has been reached by using different biobased coatings on paper substrate. The pouches exploit VTT's patent pending high consistency enzymatic fibrillation of cellulose (HefCel) technology.

"One-third of food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted globally. Packaging with efficient barrier properties is a crucial factor in the reduction of the food loss. Our solution offers an environmentally friendly option for the global packaging industry", says Senior Scientist Jari Vartiainen of VTT.

VTT's HefCel technology provides a low-cost method for the production of nanocellulose resulting in a tenfold increase in the solids content of nanocellulose. Nanocellulose has been shown to be potentially very useful for a number of future technical applications. The densely packed structure of nanocellulose films and coatings enable their outstanding oxygen, grease and mineral oil barrier properties.

HefCel technology exploits industrial enzymes and simple mixing technology as tools to fibrillate cellulose into nanoscale fibrils without the need for high energy consuming process steps. The resulting nanocellulose is in the consistency of 15-25% when traditional nanocellulose production methods result in 1-3% consistency.

The stand-up pouch is the fastest growing type of packaging, growing at a rate of 6.5% per year from 2015-2020. Fossil-based plastic films still dominate the packaging market. However, the development of environmentally friendly new materials is of growing importance. Nanocellulose has been shown to be potentially very useful for a number of future technical applications.

VTT has solid expertise in various bio-based raw materials and their application technologies for producing bio-based coatings, films and even multilayered structures both at lab-scale and pilot-scale. A versatile set of piloting facilities are available from raw material sourcing through processing to application testing and demonstration.
-end-
MEDIA MATERIAL: http://www.vttresearch.com/media/news/vtt-has-developed-stand-up-pouches-from-renewable-raw-materials-and-nanocellulose

Further information:

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd
Jari Vartiainen, Senior Scientist
tel. +358 408210748, jari.vartiainen@vtt.fi

Jaakko Pere, Senior Scientist
tel. +358 405257420, jaakko.pere@vtt.fi

Further information on VTT:

Milka Lahnalammi-Vesivalo
Communications manager
358 40 5457 828
milka.lahnalammi-vesivalo@vtt.fi
http://www.vtt.fi

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd is the leading research and technology company in the Nordic countries. We use our research and knowledge to provide expert services for our domestic and international customers and partners, and for both private and public sectors. We use 4,000,000 hours of brainpower a year to develop new technological solutions. VTT in social media: Twitter @VTTFinland, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram and Periscope.

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Related Cellulose Articles:

Scientists make biodegradable microbeads from cellulose
On World Ocean Day (8 June), researchers from the University of Bath announce they have developed biodegradable cellulose microbeads from a sustainable source that could potentially replace harmful plastic ones that contribute to ocean pollution.
Biodegradable packages will keep your food fresh
KTU researchers are creating biodegradable food packaging materials, which, in addition, will also keep food fresh for longer.
3-D printing with plants
Researchers at MIT have invented a 3-D printing process for cellulose, the world's most abundant polymer.
'Glue' that makes plant cell walls strong could hold the key to wooden skyscrapers
Molecules 10,000 times narrower than the width of a human hair could hold the key to making possible wooden skyscrapers and more energy-efficient paper production, according to research published today in the journal Nature Communications.
Mechanism of successful horizontal gene transfer between divergent organisms explained
University of Tsukuba-led researchers showed how a host's gene regulatory environment can facilitate the establishment of a gene newly arrived via horizontal transfer.
Nanocellulose in medicine and green manufacturing
American University professor develops method to improve functionality of nanocellulose.
NREL researchers discover how a bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, utilizes both CO2 and cellulose
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory made the surprise discovery that a metabolic pathway to take up CO2 exists and functions in a microorganism capable of breaking down and fermenting cellulosic biomass to produce biofuels including hydrogen and hydrocarbons.
New understanding of plant growth brings promise of tailored products for industry
In the search for low-emission plant-based fuels, new research could lead to sustainable alternatives to fossil fuel-based products.
Chemical snapshot unveils path to greener biofuel
Chemists at the University of Copenhagen have taken a leap ahead in understanding enzymes used to crack open cellulose easing subsequent fermentation into alcohol.
Researchers' new advance in quest for second generation biofuels
Scientists at the University of York are part of an international research team that has made a significant step forward in understanding the processes naturally occurring enzymes use to degrade microbe-resistant biomass, a key aim in the development of biofuels.

Related Cellulose Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".