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What is the association between singing in choir, voice disorders among children?

March 14, 2019

BottomLine: This study looked at whether singing in a children's choir was associated with developing voice disorders. Nearly 1,500 children from Spain (ages 8 to 14) were included, 752 children who sang in choirs and 743 who didn't. Children were examined for vocal cord problems; their parents, choir directors and teachers of the children who didn't sing were surveyed. Nearly 24 percent of children had a voice disorder and voice disorders were less common among children who sang in choirs, possibly because of good voice care. Limitations of the study included whether results were influenced by children who didn't understand researchers' instructions or the clarity of survey responses from adults.

Authors: Pedro Claros, M.D., Ph.D., Claros Otorhinolaryngology Clinic, Barcelona, Spain, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2019.0066)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Want to embed a link to this study in your story? This full-text link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/2727333?guestAccessKey=6ed8d2f3-0898-418f-b3f6-1cb128366506&utm_source=JAMA_Network&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=031519

JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

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