Nav: Home

NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Idai making landfall in Mozambique

March 14, 2019

Tropical Cyclone Idai was approaching landfall in Mozambique when NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the cloud top temperatures to determine the strongest parts of the storm.

On March 14, warnings were in effect in Mozambique as Idai nears landfall. Idai will affect (parts of) the Mozambique provinces of Zambézia, Sofala, Manica and Inhambane with very strong winds (190 to 210 kilometers per hour), accompanied by very heavy rains (more than 150 mm in 24 hours) and severe thunderstorms. INAM also foresees the continuation of moderate to strong rains (30 to 50 mm / 24h), accompanied by severe thunderstorms and gusty winds north of the provinces of Niassa and Cabo Delgado.

On March 14 at 7:29 a.m. EDT (1129 UTC) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures of Tropical Cyclone Idai in infrared light. AIRS found cloud top temperatures were as cold as or colder than minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 53 degrees Celsius) circling the eye. Cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms that have the capability to create heavy rain.

On March 14 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the center of Tropical Cyclone Idai was located near latitude 19.9 degrees south and longitude 36.3 degrees east. That puts the center of Idai about 258 nautical miles west-northwest of Europa Island. Idai's western quadrant was already pummeling Mozambique. Maximum sustained winds were near 100 knots (115 mph/185 kph).  The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects that Idai will maintain current intensity until landfall occurs near Beira, Mozambique within 24 hours.
-end-
For the latest advisory from the Mozambique National Meteorology Institute (INAM), visit: http://www.inam.gov.mz/index.php/pt/novo-sistema

By Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Infrared Articles:

New infrared-emitting device could allow energy harvesting from waste heat
A new reconfigurable device that emits patterns of thermal infrared light in a fully controllable manner could one day make it possible to collect waste heat at infrared wavelengths and turn it into usable energy.
Extending VCSEL wavelength coverage to the mid-infrared
There are several important gases that are detectable with mid-infrared light, having wavelengths between 3-4 micrometers.
Infrared links could simplify data center communications
Data centers are the central point of many, if not most, information systems today, but the masses of wires interconnecting the servers and piled high on racks begins to resemble last year's tangled Christmas-tree lights disaster.
Nanocubes simplify printing and imaging in color and infrared
Duke University engineers reveal a manufacturing technique that promises to bring a simplified form of printing and imaging in color and infrared into daily use.
A look at the US cold snap from NASA infrared imagery
Imagery and an animation of infrared imagery from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed the movement of cold, Arctic air over the U.S. from Dec.
Graphene plasmons reach the infrared
Graphene's unique properties can be both a blessing and a curse to researchers, especially to those at the intersection of optical and electronic applications.
Metamaterial device allows chameleon-like behavior in the infrared
An electric current will not only heat a hybrid metamaterial, but will also trigger it to change state and fade into the background like a chameleon in what may be the proof-of-concept of the first controllable metamaterial device, or metadevice, according to a team of engineers.
NASA examines System 99L over Hispaniola in infrared light
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the tropical low pressure area known as System 99L it was located over Hispaniola.
NASA sees examines new tropical storm in infrared light
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the eastern Pacific Ocean it looked at a newly developed tropical depression that would later strengthen into Tropical Storm Lester.
NASA gets an infrared look at newly formed Tropical Depression 08W
NASA's Aqua satellite recently caught a look at the newly formed tropical depression in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

Related Infrared Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Don't Fear Math
Why do many of us hate, even fear math? Why are we convinced we're bad at it? This hour, TED speakers explore the myths we tell ourselves and how changing our approach can unlock the beauty of math. Guests include budgeting specialist Phylecia Jones, mathematician and educator Dan Finkel, math teacher Eddie Woo, educator Masha Gershman, and radio personality and eternal math nerd Adam Spencer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#517 Life in Plastic, Not Fantastic
Our modern lives run on plastic. It's in the computers and phones we use. It's in our clothing, it wraps our food. It surrounds us every day, and when we throw it out, it's devastating for the environment. This week we air a live show we recorded at the 2019 Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, D.C., where Bethany Brookshire sat down with three plastics researchers - Christina Simkanin, Chelsea Rochman, and Jennifer Provencher - and a live audience to discuss plastics in our oceans. Where they are, where they are going, and what they carry with them. Related links:...