LA BioMed researcher to receive national award for career achievements

March 15, 2013

LOS ANGELES - (March 15, 2013) - The American Society for Investigative Pathology will present its highest honor, the Gold-Headed Cane Award, to Samuel W. French, MD, a principal investigator at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed), during its 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego, it was announced today.

The American Society for Investigative Pathology, a society of biomedical scientists investigating mechanisms of disease, presents the Gold-Headed Cane Award to recognize long-term contributions to pathology, including meritorious research, outstanding teaching, general excellence in the field and leadership in pathology.

"Congratulations to Dr. French for this well-deserved recognition for his distinguished career in pathology," said David I. Meyer, PhD, president and CEO of LA BioMed. "Dr. French is an outstanding representative of the highly skilled researchers and physicians whose dedication is advancing the pace of discovery at LA BioMed. He is a leader in training the next generation of medical professionals, and we are proud to have him on our faculty."

Dr. French has been affiliated with LA BioMed and Harbor-UCLA Medical Center for more than two decades and received many honors throughout his career, including a Lifetime Achievement award from the Los Angeles Society of Pathologists, Inc., seven "Best Teacher" awards from senior pathology residents at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and the Distinguished Teaching Award from Harbor-UCLA's Clinical Faculty in the Department of Medicine.

Dr. French has authored or co-authored more than 800 research papers, books and book chapters, case studies and abstracts in his field. His publications have been cited more than 13,500 times. He has been Harbor-UCLA Medical Center's chief of the Division of Anatomic Pathology since 1990 and is a distinguished professor of pathology in the Department of Pathology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.
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About LA BioMed

Founded in 1952, LA BioMed is one of the country's leading nonprofit independent biomedical research institutes. It has approximately 100 principal researchers conducting studies into improved treatments and cures for cancer, inherited diseases, infectious diseases, illnesses caused by environmental factors and more. It also educates young scientists and provides community services, including prenatal counseling and childhood nutrition programs. LA BioMed is academically affiliated with the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and located on the campus of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. For more information, please visit http://www.LABioMed.org

LA BioMed

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