Sex differences in the normal composition of the heart may explain unique gender outcomes

March 15, 2013

Groundbreaking new insights on the differences in cardiovascular pathophysiology between women and men will be presented by Marianne Legato, MD, a globally recognized expert in gender specific medicine, and consultant to the Women's Heart Foundation in her keynote address at the 98th Annual American Medical Women's Association (AMWA) Conference in New York City, on March 15-17, 2013.

"I will introduce unique nervous systems differences in cardiac function between women and men, and present findings that support variations in the normal composition of the heart with regard to cardiac outcomes," says Dr. Legato, clinical professor emeritus of medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Dr. Legato calls for accelerating research to evaluate the biological differences in heart health for both sexes to gain insights into preventive care and delivery of the best possible outcomes when coronary artery disease develops.

Other topics that will be addressed during the AMWA conference range from mentoring and breaking the glass ceiling to issues in global women's health such as advances in vascular surgery, sex differnces in cardiovascular disease, inflammatory skin disorders, arthritis, bleeding disorders and oncology
-end-
AMWA is a founding partner of the Sex and Gender Women's Health Collaborative, which aims to foster the integration of sex and gender competency across all aspects of medical education and practice. For more information, go to: sgwhc.org

About Dr. Legato:

Marianne Legato, MD is a globally recognized expert in Gender Specific Medicine, and received the American Heart Association's Blakeslee Award for the best book on cardiovascular disease. She is founder of the Partnership for Women's Health at Columbia University where she has championed the need to understand gender differences in the diagnosis and treatment of disease to the benefit of both women and me.

The Sex and Gender Women's Health Collaborative aims to foster sex and gender competency in medical education and in clinical practice by providing the most comprehensive repository for sex and gender health content for medical students and residents, and those in allied health professions. To learn more, visit: sgwhc.org

Sex and Gender Women's Health Collaborative

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