Tau transmission model opens doors for new Alzheimer's, Parkinson's therapies

March 15, 2013

SAN DIEGO - Injecting synthetic tau fibrils into animal models induces Alzheimer's-like tau tangles and imitates the spread of tau pathology, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania being presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego March 16-23, 2013.

This Alzheimer's research, along with additional Parkinson's research from Penn and beyond, further demonstrates the cell-to-cell transmission of neurodegenerative proteins. John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, co-director of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR) and professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, will present the research in the Hot Topics plenary session on Tuesday, March 19 starting at 5:15pm.

"The transmission model better explains the spread of disease within neurodegenerative disease, and has uncovered new therapeutic opportunities which we are exploring vigorously," said Dr. Trojanowski. "However, it is important to emphasize that the spread of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's pathology does not mean these diseases are infectious, like Mad Cow disease, based on data from another recent study from our group."
-end-
For supplemental information on the transmission of tau pathology, the laboratory of senior author Virginia M.-Y. Lee, Ph.D., MBA, director of CNDR and professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, published additional findings in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $4.3 billion enterprise.

The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 16 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $398 million awarded in the 2012 fiscal year.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania -- recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report; Penn Presbyterian Medical Center; and Pennsylvania Hospital -- the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Penn Medicine also includes additional patient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2012, Penn Medicine provided $827 million to benefit our community.

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Related Neurodegenerative Disease Articles from Brightsurf:

CLCN6 identified as disease gene for a severe form of lysosomal neurodegenerative disease
A mutation in the CLCN6 gene is associated with a novel, particularly severe neurodegenerative disorder.

Cellular pathway of genetic heart disease similar to neurodegenerative disease
Research on a genetic heart disease has uncovered a new and unexpected mechanism for heart failure.

New ALS guideline establishes national standard for managing neurodegenerative disease
The first Canadian guideline for the care and management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- Lou Gehrig's disease -- recommends a patient-focused approach, with attention to holistic and emotional aspects of well-being.

New study reveals undetected rare neurodegenerative disorder that looks like Parkinson's disease
New Singapore study suggests that patients who are carriers of NIID gene mutation may also present with symptoms and signs of Parkinson's disease (PD), and respond to PD drugs.

Designed a new model to predict the life expectancy of a severe neurodegenerative disease
Researchers from IDIBELL, the University of Göttingen and the University of Münster, designed six tables, using data available at the time of diagnosis, where easily extrapolate patient's life expectancy.

AI-analyzed blood test can predict the progression of neurodegenerative disease
A new study shows artificial intelligence (AI) analysis of blood samples can predict and explain disease progression, which could one day help doctors choose more appropriate and effective treatments for patients.

New study sheds light into origins of neurodegenerative disease
New research has shed light on the origins of spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) and demonstrates effective new therapeutic pathways for SCA7 and the more than 40 other types of spinocerebellar ataxia.

Protein aggregation: Protein assemblies relevant not only for neurodegenerative disease
Amyloid fibrils play a crucial role in neurodegenerative illnesses. Scientists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Forschungszentrum Jülich have now been able to use cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to decode the spatial structure of the fibrils that are formed from PI3K SH3 domains - an important model system for research.

Temple researchers: Sorting protein in neurons defends against neurodegenerative disease
Like a sorting machine in an assembly line, a molecule known as VPS35 detects and removes defective proteins from neurons.

How mutations lead to neurodegenerative disease
Scientists have discovered how mutations in DNA can cause neurodegenerative disease.

Read More: Neurodegenerative Disease News and Neurodegenerative Disease Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.