Nav: Home

Treatment lessens cerebral damage following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

March 15, 2016

Among comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, treatment with inhaled xenon gas combined with hypothermia, compared with hypothermia alone, resulted in less white matter damage; however, there was no significant difference in neurological outcomes or death at 6 months, according to a study appearing in the March 15 issue of JAMA.

Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have a poor prognosis with high rates of death and the likelihood of having severe neurological problems. Animal studies have established the neuroprotective properties of the inhaled noble gas xenon. Neuroprotection associated with xenon has been especially evident when combined with hypothermia (91.4°F to 95°F). Thus far, these neuroprotective properties have not been reported in human studies.

Timo Laitio, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Turku, Finland, and colleagues randomly assigned 110 comatose patients who had experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to receive either inhaled xenon combined with hypothermia (91.4°F) for 24 hours (n = 55) or hypothermia treatment alone (n = 55; control group). The trial was conducted at two intensive care units in Finland.

There were magnetic resonance imaging data from 97 patients a median of 53 hours after cardiac arrest. The researchers found that patients in the xenon group had less white matter damage compared to the control group. At six months, 75 patients (68 percent) were alive. There were no significant differences between the groups on measures of neurological and cognitive outcomes, or death at six months.

"These preliminary findings require further evaluation in an adequately powered clinical trial designed to assess clinical outcomes associated with inhaled xenon among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest," the authors write.
-end-
(doi:10.1001/jama.2016.1933; this study is available pre-embargo at the For The Media website.)

Editor's Note: The study was funded by the Academy of Finland and via clinical research funding from the Hospital District of Southwest Finland. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, etc.

The JAMA Network Journals

Related Cardiac Arrest Articles:

Intravenous sodium nitrite ineffective for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Among patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, intravenous sodium nitrite given by paramedics during resuscitation did not significantly improve their chances of being admitted to or discharged from the hospital alive, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Getting to the heart of epinephrine use in pediatric cardiac arrest patients
The effectiveness of epinephrine treatment during resuscitation of adult patients with cardiac arrest is generally promising, but little is known about its effects in pediatric patients.
Bystanders can help more cardiac arrest victims survive
Only 8% of Americans survive cardiac arrest outside a hospital, but that percentage could increase significantly if bystanders recognize cardiac arrest and perform simple lifesaving tasks, a UVA Health physician says in a New England Journal of Medicine article.
Opioid-related cardiac arrest patients differ from other cardiac arrests
People who suffer cardiac arrest due to an opioid overdose are younger, have fewer chronic medical conditions and may be more likely to be to receive bystander CPR, according to a review of emergency response records in Maine.
Selective coronary angiography following cardiac arrest
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp.
Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management
It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest.
Scientific statement on predicting survival for cardiac arrest survivors
If a loved one has a heart attack that stops the heart, ends up in a coma, and the treating physician approaches you about taking the person off life support, would you trust that the physician knows when to make the call or how to judge that the person won't recover?
Cardiac arrest among hospitalized patients may be underestimated
More patients may be having cardiac arrests in the hospital than previously believed.
Women are less likely to be resuscitated and survive a cardiac arrest than men
Women who have a cardiac arrest outside the hospital setting are less likely to receive resuscitation from bystanders and more likely to die than men, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal.
Compression-only CPR increases survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
In a Swedish study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, bystander CPR rates nearly doubled and compression-only, or Hands-Only CPR, rates increased six-fold over the 18-year review.
More Cardiac Arrest News and Cardiac Arrest Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.