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Four year agreement to supply Silicon Carbide micro-fiber

March 15, 2017

Haydale Graphene Industries plc, the UK listed global nanomaterials group, is pleased to announce that its subsidiary, Advanced Composite Materials LLC, has entered into a four-year agreement to supply Silicon Carbide micro-fiber to a global industrial manufacturer of tooling and wear-resistant solutions.

Following a period of stringent testing, the Haydale SiC fiber has been approved for use in the production of SiC whisker reinforced cutting tools. There is considerable demand for SiC whisker reinforced cutting tools which are used extensively across a range of industries and more specifically, for the production, of land based turbines and jet engine fan blades.

This Agreement marks a significant step forward for ACM, which is also now proactively selling Haydale's range of graphene enhanced composites, 3D printing filaments and additives into the North American market.

Commenting on the Agreement, Trevor Rudderham, CEO of Haydale Technologies, Inc. said: "We have made great progress over the past four months since our acquisition of ACM. We have solidified existing contracts and have now started winning new sales accounts such as this one asking for deliveries in the next quarter. This demonstrates our focus on building long term business partnerships with best in class corporations. As we continue to integrate all of the products and services Haydale offers into the US, we are confident of achieving continued success."
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Hermes Financial Public Relations

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