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NASA tracks Tropical Cyclone Idai over Mozambique

March 15, 2019

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone continued to move in a westerly direction after making landfall in Mozambique.

On March 15, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Idai. The imagery showed the storm centered over central Mozambique and its western quadrant had already spread into Zimbabwe. Even over land, the system still showed a ragged eye on microwave satellite imagery.

At 0300 UTC on March 15 (11 p.m. EDT on March 14), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC issued the final warning on Idai. At the time, Idai was over land and had maximum sustained winds near 90 knots (103.6 mph/166.7 kph). It was centered near 19.6 degrees north latitude and 34.8 degrees east longitude.

Idai is expected to affect parts of the Mozambique provinces of Zambézia, Sofala, Manica, Tete and Inhambane. Moderate to strong rains accompanied by severe thunderstorms and gusty winds are expected in the north of the provinces of Niassa, Cabo Delgado and northern Tete.

JTWC has forecast Idai to rapidly weaken as it tracks across central Mozambique and into northern Zimbabwe.

For the latest advisory from the Mozambique National Meteorology Institute (INAM), visit: http://www.inam.gov.mz/index.php/pt/novo-sistema

By Rob Gutro NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
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NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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