Half-million cosmetic plastic surgery procedures for Hispanics in 2004 - up 49% from 2000

March 16, 2005

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. - Hispanics had nearly 553,000 cosmetic plastic surgery procedures in 2004, an increase of 49 percent from 2000 and a 7 percent increase from 2003, according to statistics released today by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). Hispanics led all minority groups in the number of procedures performed, comprising 6 percent of the 9.2 million cosmetic surgery procedures performed in 2004, followed by African Americans with 5 percent (461,000 procedures), and Asians with 3 percent (276,000 procedures).

"This tremendous growth shows that Hispanics have adopted and adapted to many U.S. cultural norms," said ASPS Past President James Wells, MD, a bi-lingual plastic surgeon. "Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnic group in America and body image is increasingly important to them as they move up the socio-economic ladder."

According to ASPS statistics, the most commonly requested surgical cosmetic procedures for Hispanics in 2004 were nose reshaping, breast augmentation, and liposuction. The most commonly requested minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures for Hispanics were Botox®, microdermabrasion, injectable wrinkle fillers, and chemical peel.

In addition, the most commonly requested surgical procedures for African Americans in 2004 were nose reshaping, breast reduction, and liposuction. The most commonly requested surgical procedures for Asians were nose reshaping, eyelid surgery, and breast augmentation. The most commonly requested minimally-invasive procedures for both ethnic groups were Botox, injectable wrinkle fillers, chemical peel, and microdermabrasion. Both African Americans and Asians had a 24 percent increase in cosmetic surgery procedures from 2000.

"We see younger Hispanic baby boomers and patients in their 20s and 30s coming in for minimally-invasive procedures and surgical procedures like liposuction and breast augmentation most often," said Dr. Wells. "These generations tend to be more accepting and open about cosmetic surgery."

Reality TV shows are also creating a greater public awareness for cosmetic surgery in the Hispanic community.

"Hispanics are getting more exposure to cosmetic surgery through TV programming shown in South America, Central America, and in the United States," said Florida Society of Plastic Surgeons President Onelio Garcia, MD, who estimates 50 percent of his patients are Hispanic. "These shows are helping Hispanic patients become more comfortable with cosmetic surgery by discussing procedural options and showing Hispanic patients and plastic surgeons."

With the number of Hispanics opting for cosmetic surgery increasing, it is ever important for patients to learn what to look for when choosing a plastic surgeon and operating facility.

"Hispanic patients need to be aware of the importance of choosing an ASPS Member Surgeon to ensure quality, training and board-certification in plastic surgery," said Dr. Wells. "There are physicians and non-physicians who may prey on Hispanic patients because of language barriers - building a false sense of trust with the patient simply because they too speak Spanish. Little 'clínicas' and 'boutiques' are not the best places to have cosmetic surgery."

To help ensure optimal results and to limit risks and complications, the ASPS offers the following tips to patients considering cosmetic surgery.

  • Do Your Homework: Research the procedure, the benefits, and the risks. Refer to www.plasticsurgery.org for the latest information on plastic surgery procedures.

  • Have Realistic Expectations: Ask your plastic surgeon questions about how the surgery will work for you: identify expectations and understand side effects and recovery time.

  • Be Informed: Talk to patients who have had your procedure so you know what to expect.

  • Require a Medical Evaluation: Consult with your plastic surgeon for an evaluation and discuss your full medical history to determine the most appropriate treatment.

  • Choose an ASPS Member Surgeon: Why? ASPS Member Surgeons are qualified, trained, properly certified, experienced in your procedure, and only operate in accredited facilities.

    To ensure plastic surgery procedures are not overstated, the ASPS has refined the methodology for its collection of statistics to offer more accurate, reliable, and realistic data on plastic surgery. Since 2003, statistics have been collected through the first online national database for plastic surgery procedures, Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons (TOPS). This data, combined with the annual survey sent to more than 17,000 board-certified physicians in specialties most likely to perform plastic surgery, results in the most comprehensive census on plastic surgery procedures.
    -end-
    For referrals to ASPS Member Surgeons, call 888-4-PLASTIC (888-475-2784) or visit www.plasticsurgery.org. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. With more than 5,000 members, the society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. www.plasticsurgery.org

    American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Related Plastic Surgery Articles from Brightsurf:

    Is zoom increasing the demand for plastic surgery
    Patients are seeking plastic surgery in record numbers, citing their appearance on Zoom as a cause.

    The psychosocial benefits of plastic surgery for young women with congenital breast asymmetry
    Nearly all women have breasts that are slightly different from each other.

    Age-related features of facial anatomy for increase safety during plastic surgery
    Researchers from the Center for Diagnostics and Telemedicine together with colleagues from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, University of Munich and Sechenov University used computed tomography to analyze the individual anatomy of the nasolabial triangle.

    New study examines the accuracy of plastic surgery videos on social media
    In the era of 'Dr. Google,' social media is a tremendous influence on patients interested in cosmetic surgery, and with more than two billion users -- representing almost one-third of the internet -- YouTube has emerged as an essential platform for reaching people interested in plastic surgery.

    Facial plastic surgery in men enhances perception of attractiveness, trustworthiness
    In the first of a kind study, plastic surgeons at Georgetown University found that when a man chose to have facial plastic surgery, it significantly increased perceptions of attractiveness, likeability, social skills, or trustworthiness.

    More men undergo plastic surgery as the daddy-do-over trend rises in popularity
    Just as women can turn to a suite of procedures, known as the 'Mommy Makeover,' more men are embracing their own set of treatments, the 'Daddy Do-Over,' to boost their confidence and improve their physical appearance.

    New plastic surgery statistics reveal trends toward body enhancement
    New data released by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) shows there were nearly a quarter million more cosmetic procedures performed in 2018 than the previous year.

    How common is persistent opioid use after plastic, reconstructive surgery?
    This study examined how common persistent opioid use was after plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures of the nose, eye, breast, abdomen and soft tissue.

    CRISPR gene editing will find applications in plastic and reconstructive surgery
    The CRISPR genome editing technique promises to be a 'transformative leap' in genetic engineering and therapy, affecting almost every area of medicine.

    Patient satisfaction with plastic surgery -- it's the surgeon, not the practice
    Patient satisfaction after plastic surgery is most affected by surgeon-related factors, such as taking the time to answer questions and including patients in the decision-making process, reports a study in the September issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

    Read More: Plastic Surgery News and Plastic Surgery Current Events
  • Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.