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Will future population growth be limited by freshwater availability?

March 16, 2015

The global human population is growing faster than the water supply. Investigators recently analyzed various models and trends to assess both optimistic and pessimistic projections of future water use and shortages.

"Historically, water supply has grown through alternating periods of rapid growth and stagnation, and we now seem to be entering a new period of stagnation while the population continues to grow," said Dr. Anthony Parolari, lead author of the WIREs Water article. "To avoid water scarcity from this point forward, the alternatives include further water supply improvements through technological innovation, or we may need to consider more seriously the concept of a sustainable rate of global water use."
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Wiley

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