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PETA science group promotes animal-free science at society of toxicology conference

March 16, 2017

Baltimore -- The PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. is presenting two posters on animal-free methods for testing inhalation toxicity at the 56th annual Society of Toxicology (SOT) meeting March 12 to 16, 2017, in Baltimore, Maryland. This meeting is the largest international conference of its kind, drawing approximately 7,000 scientists from more than 50 countries each year.

One poster focuses on Consortium-funded research to develop an in vitro system to predict the development of lung fibrosis. The results show that the system can be used to detect pro-fibrotic markers following exposure of human lung cells to carbon nanotubes. The second poster highlights the use of adverse outcome pathways to design in vitro approaches to inhalation testing.

"Our posters demonstrate how animal-free tests are able to provide information that can give us a better understanding of human health and protect us from toxic chemicals," says Dr. Amy Clippinger, associate director of the PETA International Science Consortium. "In addition to the scientific benefits, our work aims to avoid testing these toxic substances by forcing animals to inhale them."

The Consortium is also organizing a meeting as a follow-up to a workshop that it co-hosted last year on alternative approaches to acute inhalation toxicity testing. This meeting will update participants on the progress that has been made since the workshop.

This year, Consortium scientist Clippinger is also serving as the president of SOT's In Vitro and Alternative Methods Specialty Section, which is made up of more than 400 members who are interested in alternatives to animal testing. In addition to its annual luncheon, the Specialty Section has organized its first networking event, which will take place on the evening of Monday, March 13.
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The PETA International Science Consortium Ltd. works to accelerate the development, validation, and global implementation of animal-free science. It was established in 2012 and coordinates the scientific and regulatory expertise of its members -- PETA U.K., PETA U.S., PETA France, PETA Germany, PETA India, PETA Netherlands, PETA Asia, and PETA Australia.

For more information, please visit PISCLTD.org.uk or http://www.piscltd.org.uk/sot2017.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

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