Some clinical trials explicitly exclude gay and lesbian patients

March 17, 2010

PHILADELPHIA (March 17, 2010)--All clinical trials have guidelines that clearly state who can and cannot participate, but according to the National Institutes of Health these guidelines are typically based on age, gender, previous treatment history, the type and stage of a disease, and other medically relevant factors. However, researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center have gathered evidence indicating that some trials explicitly exclude individuals based on their sexual orientation. Their findings are published in a research letter appearing in the March 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

By performing exploratory searches of ClinicalTrials.gov--a site containing detailed information on over 80,000 clinical trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, other governmental agencies, and private industry-- for explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria that required participants to be in heterosexual relationships, Brian Egleston, Ph.D., an assistant research professor of biostatistics and bioinformatics at Fox Chase, and colleagues found that exclusion of lesbians and gay men from clinical trials in the United States is not uncommon, particularly in studies with sexual function as an endpoint. His coauthors included Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers Roland Dunbrack, Jr., Ph.D., and Michael Hall, M.D.

"Most gay and lesbian patients are probably unaware that their sexual orientation is being used as a screening factor for clinical trial participation", notes Egleston. "This is a potentially significant issue, both for patients and the medical research community."

The searches, which included only trials with sites in the United States, showed that 15 percent of the identified studies using the terms "erectile dysfunction," "couples," and "hypoactive" had exclusionary language. In addition, the results indicated that industry sponsored trials, multi-region trials, and Phase III trials were more likely to exclude lesbians and gay men among these studies.

"The trials that exclude gay and lesbian patients tend to be larger efficacy clinical trials. Further, by requiring patients to be in heterosexual relationships, many studies are also excluding unmarried or unpartnered patients regardless of sexual orientation," says Dunbrack.

To ensure that there was not a general pattern of exclusionary language missed, the researchers also looked at 1,019 studies identified by the search term "asthma." This search did not find any studies that excluded lesbians and gay men.
-end-
Fox Chase Cancer Center is one of the leading cancer research and treatments centers in the United States. Founded in 1904 in Philadelphia as one of the nation's first cancer hospitals, Fox Chase was also among the first institutions to be designated a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center in 1974. Fox Chase researchers have won the highest awards in their fields, including two Nobel Prizes. Fox Chase physicians are also routinely recognized in national rankings, and the Center's nursing program has received the Magnet status for excellence three consecutive times. Today, Fox Chase conducts a broad array of nationally competitive basic, translational, and clinical research, with special programs in cancer prevention, detection, survivorship, and community outreach. For more information, visit Fox Chase's web site at www.fccc.edu or call 1-888-FOX-CHASE or 1-888-369-2427.

Fox Chase Cancer Center

Related Clinical Trials Articles from Brightsurf:

Nearly 1 in 5 cancer patients less likely to enroll in clinical trials during pandemic
A significant portion of cancer patients may be less likely to enroll in a clinical trial due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

COVID-19 clinical trials lack diversity
Despite disproportionately higher rates of COVID-19 infection, hospitalization and death among people of color, minority groups are significantly underrepresented in COVID-19 clinical trials.

Why we should trust registered clinical trials
In a time when we have to rely on clinical trials for COVID-19 drugs and vaccines, a new study brings good news about the credibility of registered clinical trials.

Inclusion of children in clinical trials of treatments for COVID-19
This Viewpoint discusses the exclusion of children from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical trials and why that could harm treatment options for children.

Review evaluates how AI could boost the success of clinical trials
In a review publishing July 17, 2019 in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, researchers examined how artificial intelligence (AI) could affect drug development in the coming decade.

Kidney patients are neglected in clinical trials
The exclusion of patients with kidney diseases from clinical trials remains an unsolved problem that hinders optimal care of these patients.

Clinical trials beginning for possible preeclampsia treatment
For over 20 years, a team of researchers at Lund University has worked on developing a drug against preeclampsia -- a serious disorder which annually affects around 9 million pregnant women worldwide and is one of the main causes of death in both mothers and unborn babies.

Underenrollment in clinical trials: Patients not the problem
The authors of the study published this month in the Journal of Clinical Oncology investigated why many cancer clinical trials fail to enroll enough patients.

When designing clinical trials for huntington's disease, first ask the experts
Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments.

New ALS therapy in clinical trials
New research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Read More: Clinical Trials News and Clinical Trials Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.