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Soil bacteria, meerkats and ocean particles top the 2017 HFSP Postdoctoral Fellowships

March 17, 2017

The International Human Frontier Science Program Organization (HFSPO) supports 85 of the world's most outstanding young scientists with the sought after HFSP international postdoctoral fellowships for 2017 following a rigorous selection process in a global competition. A total of 928 applications were submitted in this round from applicants originating from 61 different countries.

HFSPO awards 74 Long-Term Fellowships to life scientists embarking on a new project in another field of biology and 11 Cross-Disciplinary Fellowships that will support young scientists with a non-life science PhD degree such as chemistry or physics. The latter are particularly special with projects ranging from investigating the chemistry of glycyl radical enzymes in human microbiota to trying to engineer self-replicating colloidal strings, or using non-invasive organic electronics to demonstrate neural dynamics. The links of the life sciences with neighboring disciplines is also reflected in the Long-Term Fellowship projects, in which the new HFSP fellows will push the use of quantitative approaches to modern biology such as microscale level particle degradation in the oceans, novel approaches to study movement in meerkats, or exploration of novel drug combinations that are inspired by soil bacteria.

HFSPO Secretary General Warwick Anderson strongly believes "that postdoctoral research projects are essential in providing interdisciplinary experience for advancing knowledge in the life sciences." In particular the Cross-Disciplinary Fellowships will "make a difference in enabling the next generation of scientists to carry out frontier research."

HFSP's fellowships enjoy an excellent reputation and offer a built in return component. Starting in their second year of tenure, HFSP fellows can draw up plans for setting up their own independent laboratory. Fellows can then use the remaining time of their tenure to move to the new location. A fellowship is worth about $180,000 spread over three years and includes support for research costs and child care.

Full lists of the 2017 awards are available on the HFSP website at http://www.hfsp.org/awardees/newly-awarded.
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The Human Frontier Science Program is an international program of research support implemented by the International Human Frontier Science Program Organization (HFSPO) based in Strasbourg, France. Its aims are to promote intercontinental collaboration and training in cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research focused on the life sciences. HFSPO receives financial support from the governments or research councils of Australia, Canada, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Singapore, Switzerland, the UK, the USA, as well as from the European Union.

Human Frontier Science Program

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