Nav: Home

Organs can talk

March 17, 2017

Drs. Marie-Josée Hébert and Mélanie Dieudé have discovered a new cell structure responsible for previously unexplained rejections following an organ transplant. They have also identified a drug capable of preventing this type of rejection. Recipients of the Award of Excellence in Research - Science Contribution of 2016 at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUMM), they explain that this discovery could one day revolutionize transplant practice. VIDEO: bit.ly/2n6aEbE

With the collaboration of the Canadian National Transplant Research Program, they continue their research to learn the language of organs.

Drs. Hébert and Dieudé have discovered a new cell structure responsible for previously unexplained rejections following an organ transplant. Before transplanting an organ, physicians check compatibility between the donor and recipient. Despite these precautions, approximately one in ten transplants ends up being rejected by the recipient.

"We have found the mechanism that causes a person to react against components in his own blood vessels even before receiving an organ transplant. We have also identified a drug capable of preventing this type of rejection," says Dr. Marie-Josée Hébert, transplant specialist and CRCHUM researcher. One day, this discovery could revolutionize transplant practice by changing the assessment of rejection risks in heart, lung, kidney or liver transplant recipients.
-end-
To find out more http://bit.ly/1OwBPiH

About the original study

The article "The 20S proteasome core, active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, induces autoantibody production and accelerates rejection" was published in the journal Science Translational Medicine on December 16, 2015. The Canadian National Transplant Research Program, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (MOP-15447), the Kidney Foundation of Canada, the Canadian Cancer Society, and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (311598 and 386598) funded this study. Marie-Josée Hébert holds the Shire Chair in Nephrology and Renal Transplantation and Regeneration. For more information, see the study: DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aac9816

About the CRCHUM's Research Awards of Excellence

Awarded yearly since 2012, the CRCHUM's Research Awards of Excellence are honorary awards given to CHUM researchers who make significant contributions to the advancement of health research. The award winners are selected from among the approximately 150 regular researchers within the institution.

About the CRCHUM

The University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) is one of the largest hospital-based research centres in North America. Our mission is to improve the health of adults through a continuum of research from basic science, to population health, to clinical research. More than 1,750 people work at the CRCHUM, including 439 researchers and 700 students and research trainees: crchum.chumontreal.qc.ca/en

Source: University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM)

Information:
Isabelle Girard
Information advisor
CRCHUM
Phone: +1 514 890-8000, extension 12725 | @CRCHUM
isabelle.girard.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca

University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM)

Related Blood Vessels Articles:

3D printing, bioinks create implantable blood vessels
A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3D cell printing technique and bioinks.
When blood vessels are overly permeable
In Germany alone there are around 400,000 patients who suffer from chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.
Nicotine-free e-cigarettes can damage blood vessels
A Penn study reveals single instance of vaping immediately leads to reduced vascular function.
Creating blood vessels on demand
Researchers discover new cell population that can help in regenerative processes.
Self-sustaining, bioengineered blood vessels could replace damaged vessels in patients
A research team has bioengineered blood vessels that safely and effectively integrated into the native circulatory systems of 60 patients with end-stage kidney failure over a four-year phase 2 clinical trial.
Found: the missing ingredient to grow blood vessels
Researchers have discovered an ingredient vital for proper blood vessel formation that explains why numerous promising treatments have failed.
How sickled red blood cells stick to blood vessels
An MIT study describes how sickled red blood cells get stuck in tiny blood vessels of patients with sickle-cell disease.
Like a zipper -- how cells form new blood vessels
Blood vessel formation relies on the ability of vascular cells to move while remaining firmly connected to each other.
Blood vessels instruct brain development
The group of Amparo Acker-Palmer (Buchmann Institute of Molecular Life Sciences and the Institute of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Goethe University) reported in a Research Article in the last issue of the journal Science a novel function of blood vessels in orchestrating the proper development of neuronal cellular networks in the brain.
Texas A&M team develops new way to grow blood vessels
Formation of new blood vessels, a process also known as angiogenesis, is one of the major clinical challenges in wound healing and tissue implants.
More Blood Vessels News and Blood Vessels Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.