Leslie Roberts of Science wins ASM Public Communications Award

March 18, 2005

Washington, DC--March 18, 2005--Leslie Roberts has been named the winner of the 2005 ASM Public Communications Award. Roberts' award-winning entry, "Polio: The Final Assault," published in the March 26, 2004 issue of Science, presents a compelling picture of how microbiology, public health, and society interact. Reporting from Washington, Atlanta, and India, Roberts explains why the 16-year, multibillion dollar effort to eradicate polio remains tantalizingly short of its goal, and why those leading the effort believe that victory may finally be achievable. It is a story of microbiology in the real world that tells why the oral polio vaccine that revolutionized immunization in the industrialized world has encountered obstacles ranging from reduced efficacy to social and political opposition in the developing world.

The Award, established in 1996 to recognize achievement in promoting public understanding of microbiology, consists of a plaque and $2,500 cash prize. It will be presented this year in Atlanta on June 6 during the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

Judges called Roberts' story "first-rate reporting," "an important story meticulously researched and beautifully told," and "a compelling read without loss of technical accuracy."

Since 2000, Roberts has been deputy news editor at the weekly magazine Science, where she works with a team of reporters covering infectious diseases, both old foes like polio and emerging threats like avian influenza. She also coordinates the magazine's coverage of biomedicine and environment/ecology. In a previous stint at Science in the 1980s and 1990s, Roberts was a senior writer specializing in genetics and the environment.

Roberts has also served as editor-in-chief at the World Resources Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, where she worked on issues of environment, development, and human health; and as senior editor then editor-in-chief of Issues in Science and Technology, the policy journal of the National Academy of Sciences.

Judges for this year's Award were Rick Weiss, the Washington Post; Marilyn Marchione, Medical Writer, Associated Press; and Janet Ginsburg, freelance and previous ASM Communications Award winner.
-end-
The American Society for Microbiology, headquartered in Washington, D.C., is the largest single life science association, with 42,000 members worldwide. Its members work in educational, research, industrial, and government settings on issues such as the environment, the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, laboratory and diagnostic medicine, and food and water safety. The ASM's mission is to gain a better understanding of basic life processes and to promote the application of this knowledge for improved health and economic and environmental well-being.

American Society for Microbiology

Related Microbiology Articles from Brightsurf:

79 Fellows elected to the American Academy of Microbiology
In January of 2015, the American Academy of Microbiology elected 79 new Fellows.

New discovery in the microbiology of serious human disease
Previously undiscovered secrets of how human cells interact with a bacterium which causes a serious human disease have been revealed in new research by microbiologists at The University of Nottingham.

4 cells turn seabed microbiology upside down
With DNA from just four cells, researchers reveal how some of the world's most abundant organisms play a key role in carbon cycling in the seabed.

87 scientists elected to the American Academy of Microbiology
Eighty-seven microbiologists have been elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology.

Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
This release includes information about these articles: Specific Bacterial Species May Initiate, Maintain Crohn's; Bacteria Involved in Sewer Pipe Corrosion Identified; Antibodies to Immune Cells Protect Eyes In Pseudomonas Infection; Dangerous Form of MRSA, Endemic In Many US Hospitals, Increasing in UK.

Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
Upcoming articles from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology include:

Microbiology brought to life in Nottingham
Antimicrobial insect brains, mouth bacteria behaving badly and the hundreds of microbial communities that lurk in household dust are just some of the highlights at the Society for General Microbiology's autumn meeting in Nottingham next week.

Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
The following are tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology:

Tips from the journals of the American Society for Microbiology
The following are tips from the Journals of the American Society for Microbiology:

New text focuses on microbiology of historic artifacts
Historic and culturally important artifacts, like all materials, are vulnerable to microbial attack.

Read More: Microbiology News and Microbiology Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.