Nav: Home

How a positive work environment leads to feelings of inclusion among employees

March 18, 2019

BINGHAMTON, NY - Fostering an inclusive work environment can lead to higher satisfaction, innovation, trust and retention among employees, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Kim Brimhall, assistant professor of social work at Binghamton University's College of Community and Public Affairs, noticed how the nonprofit sector generally suffers from high employee-turnover rates, low work performance and deficits among the leadership, and wanted to find out what could be done to break this cycle. She partnered with a large nonprofit hospital in Los Angeles, surveying employees on topics such as leader engagement, inclusion, innovation, job satisfaction and perceived quality of care. The full study also included one-on-one qualitative interviews, as well as several organizational observations.

Analyzing the data, Brimhall found that leaders who seek the input of organizational members from all job positions and encourage everyone, regardless of educational background or job responsibilities, to take initiative and participate in work-related processes are more likely to increase feelings of inclusion. This then leads to increased innovation, employee job satisfaction and quality of services in nonprofit organizations.

"When nonprofit organization members believe that they are valued for their unique personal characteristics and are recognized as important members of the organization, employee engagement, trust, satisfaction, commitment and retention improve," wrote Brimhall. "Leader engagement, that is, a leader's ability to actively engage all organizational members in critical decision making, may foster a climate for inclusion and positive organizational outcomes, such as a climate for innovation, job satisfaction and perceived quality of care."

The implications of these findings have applicability across national settings and for effective management of nonprofit organizations internationally, wrote Brimhall.

She hopes to develop economically practical, evidence-based tools that leaders can utilize to create inclusive work environments. She is partnering with another large nonprofit hospital to conduct an experimental study testing workplace interventions. These tools could help employees feel included and possibly lead to more innovation in the workplace and overall improvement in their feelings toward their job, which would then translate to improved quality of care given to clients.

The paper, "Inclusion is Important...But How Do I Include? Examining the Effects of Leader Engagement on Inclusion, Innovation, Job Satisfaction, and Perceived Quality of Care in a Diverse Nonprofit Health Care Organization," was published in Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly.
-end-


Binghamton University

Related Innovation Articles:

Shaping the future of health innovation
Future advances in healthcare will be aided by a new £10 million facility -- the National Institute for Health Research Innovation Observatory based at Newcastle University, UK.
Building on the foundations of innovation
The new issue of Technology and Innovation has a special section on the 2016 NAI Conference, including articles on gender and bias in science, the history of the National Academy of Inventors, alternative rubber crops, and the next industrial revolution.
What is innovation, and how can we awaken its dormant traits and cultivate them?
While education may not be able to create innovative traits in individuals, education may improve the ability of individuals to utilize the traits they already possess.
LA BioMed's 4th Annual Innovation Showcase
The Innovation Showcase will be attended by over 300 entrepreneurs, investors, executives from biotech and pharma medical devices companies, legal experts, service providers, prominent scientists, and technology transfer personnel from premier academic institutions.
Accelerating low-carbon innovation through policy
Will innovative technologies contribute to mitigating climate change? Learn about the successes and failures of low-carbon technology and how policy instruments help and hinder technological innovation.
The next Horizon: Strategies to promote European competitiveness in innovation
EU-LIFE, the alliance of research centers in life sciences to support and strengthen European research excellence released today a statement with its recommendations for next framework program for Research & Innovation, FP9.
Can we put a price on healthcare innovation in cancer?
Is there evidence that the money spent on innovation 'for the cure' actually benefits cancer patients?
Alzheimer's treatment innovation pipeline is building
A new analysis of the Phase II Alzheimer's drug pipeline, conducted by ResearchersAgainstAlzheimer's, revealed 57 new Alzheimer's drugs.
Business investment in innovation pays off
Firms need to invest in innovation in order to create new technologies and move the economy forward, according to new research from the University of Houston.
Technology and innovation not driven by climate change
Middle Stone Age of southern Africa is a period of dramatic innovation in subsistence, cultural and technical practices.

Related Innovation Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...