Nav: Home

Ultrasound provides precise, minimally invasive way to measure heart function in children

March 18, 2019

Currently, a practical, precise, minimally invasive way to measure cardiac output or heart function in children undergoing surgery does not exist. New research published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), illustrates how a novel minimally invasive method using catheter-based ultrasound to measure heart function performed with similar precision to a traditional highly invasive device.

Cardiac output, the volume of blood pumped by the heart per minute, is a crucial component of vital signs monitored in surgical patients. Evaluation by physical examination of critically ill children is often imprecise. Most devices used to monitor cardiac output are adapted from adult patients with limited use in children, due to differences in size, technical limitations, and risk of complications. Physicians have almost no available alternatives to manage and measure how a pediatric patient's heart is responding to different therapies, since there are no practical and precise minimally invasive ways to measure cardiac output in infants and young children.

"This new technology is less invasive than earlier technologies and can be used while patients are awake, which makes it more clinically practical for young children," said Theodor S. Sigurdsson, M.D., pediatric anesthesiologist, at Children's Hospital, University Hospital of Lund in Sweden. "Our results demonstrate that this technology was not only easily adaptable in young children but also very accurate and precise. It could aid further validation of the next generation of non-invasive hemodynamic monitors in the intensive care setting."

In the study, researchers used ultrasound sensors to produce precise measurements that were comparable to those obtained using a more traditional method of placing a probe around the patient's aorta to measure heart function. Forty-three children between the ages of one and 44 months scheduled for corrective cardiac surgery were studied. Researchers measured heart function using both the invasive perivascular flow probe and the new minimally invasive ultrasound technology. After administering a saline injection, researchers were able to detect blood dilution levels using ultrasound sensors attached to an arteriovenous loop connected to catheters in the patient's internal jugular vein and radial artery. The process is minimally invasive because it uses existing catheters and does not require additional invasive procedures.

After surgery, five consecutive repeated cardiac measurements were performed using both methods simultaneously, for a total of 215 cardiac output measurements. The ultrasound sensors showed a statistically similar precision for measuring cardiac output when compared to the results obtained using the periaortic flow probe.

In an accompanying editorial, Christine T. Trieu, M.D., physician anesthesiologist, at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, noted there are very few commercially available, precise cardiac output monitoring devices for infants and young children.

"Despite the encouraging results from this study, there are still many challenges in developing the ideal cardiac output monitor for pediatric patients," said Dr. Trieu. "This is the reason why we welcome and applaud the study by Dr. Sigurdsson et al; it offers the possibility of a simple and reliable method that uses arterial line and central line to measure cardiac output in children of all sizes."
-end-
THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF ANESTHESIOLOGISTS

Founded in 1905, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) is an educational, research and scientific society with more than 53,000 members organized to raise and maintain the standards of the medical practice of anesthesiology. ASA is committed to ensuring physician anesthesiologists evaluate and supervise the medical care of patients before, during and after surgery to provide the highest quality and safest care every patient deserves.

For more information on the field of anesthesiology, visit the American Society of Anesthesiologists online at asahq.org. To learn more about the role physician anesthesiologists play in ensuring patient safety, visit asahq.org/WhenSecondsCount. Like ASA on Facebook; follow ASALifeline on Twitter.

American Society of Anesthesiologists

Related Heart Function Articles:

Young at heart: Restoring cardiac function with a matrix molecule
Research at the Weizmann Institute of Science has uncovered a molecule in newborn hearts that appears to control the renewal process.
Statins associated with improved heart structure and function
Statins are associated with improved heart structure and function, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017.
Function of olfactory receptor in the human heart identified
Researchers have identified the function of olfactory receptors in the human heart muscle, such as are also present in the nose.
Preventing blood clots with a new metric for heart function
Scientists from Johns Hopkins University and Ohio State University have discovered a new method for predicting those most at risk for thrombus, or blood clots, in the heart.
One gene mutation, two diseases, many insights into human heart function
Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes linked a single gene mutation to two types of heart disease: one causes a hole in the heart of infants, and the other causes heart failure.
Short-term sleep deprivation affects heart function
Too little sleep takes a toll on your heart, according to a new study to be presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.
Clinical trial to use heart-derived stem cells to restore heart tissue, function
In an article outlining the methodology for an upcoming clinical trial, a multi-center team of researchers discuss the therapeutic potential and logistics of using a cluster of cardiac cells, including stem cells, called 'cardiosphere-derived cells' (CDCs) for myocardial infarction (MI -- commonly referred to as heart attack).
For normal heart function, look beyond the genes
Berkeley Lab researchers have compiled a comprehensive genome-wide map of more than 80,000 enhancers considered relevant to human heart development and function.
GW researchers receive $1.6 million to improve cardiac function during heart failure
Researchers at the George Washington University received $1.6 million from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to find ways to restore parasympathetic activity to the heart through oxytocin neuron activation.
Scientists find what might be responsible for slow heart function under general anesthesia
Anesthesia is used every day, but surprisingly little is known about one of its most dangerous side effects -- depressed heart function.

Related Heart Function Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".