Nav: Home

BJC press notice

March 19, 2019

Paper: Serious Adverse Events in African American Cancer Patients with Sickle Cell Trait and Inherited Hemoglobinopathies in a SEER-Medicare Claims Cohort
Corresponding author: Dr Helen Swede
Contact: swede@uchc.edu

Author summary: African-American cancer patients die at higher rates than white patients despite recent longevity increases for patients in all race/ethnic groups. Some studies have shown African-Americans have worse outcomes even when they receive the same treatment as whites. This first-of-a kind study showed that African-American patients with inherited red blood cell conditions were 20% more likely to have at least one serious adverse event, such as a hospitalization or emergency visit, compared to patients of any race without such a disorder. This is the first study to evaluate if patients with these disorders are more prone to treatment complications possibly arising from the rigors of therapy. Many of these inherited conditions are disproportionately higher in the African-American population compared to whites, particularly sickle cell trait (8.5% vs < 0.1%, respectively.) Our findings suggest inherited red blood cell disorders could account for some of the persistent differences in cancer outcomes among African-Americans.

Post embargo link: http://www.nature.com/bjc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/s41416-019-0416-7.html

DOI: s41416-019-0416-7

Paper: Recommendations for determining HPV status in patients with oropharyngeal cancers under TNM8 guidelines: a two-tier approach
Corresponding author: Dr Jacqueline James, Queen's University Belfast
Contact: j.james@qub.ac.uk, 028 90975781 (2915)

Author summary: Doctors use 'Staging' to determine how advanced a cancer is which helps with treatment planning and predicting survival. The new international cancer staging strategy introduced in 2018 proposes oropharyngeal cancers (OPC) are tested, using a surrogate marker called p16, for high risk human papilloma virus (HPV) which is thought to cause some OPCs. Patients with HPV positive OPC generally respond well to treatment and have better outcomes than those who are HPV negative. Clinical trials to evaluate reduced treatment for HPV positive OPC are showing much promise.

Our study suggests a second laboratory test is needed following p16 testing to truly establish HPV status. We show a percentage of OPC patients (~10%) who are p16 positive but HPV negative have poor survival characteristics similar to patients who are p16 negative. Our findings imply that the current staging strategy will lead to some patients not receiving appropriate treatment for their OPC.

Post embargo link: http://www.nature.com/bjc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/s41416-019-0414-9.html

DOI: s41416-019-0414-9
-end-
Please contact the BJC press office for the full paper or with any other questions on 0203 469 8300, out of hours, 07050 264 059 or bjcpress@cancer.org.uk. Scientists can be directly contacted regarding media interviews using the contact details provided.

Please reference the British Journal of Cancer in any media activity.

The British Journal of Cancer is editorially independent of Cancer Research UK. The BJC is one of the most-cited general cancer journals, publishing significant advances in translational and clinical cancer research. It also publishes high-quality reviews and thought-provoking comment on all aspects of cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The BJC is owned by Cancer Research UK and published by Springer Nature.

https://www.nature.com/bjc/

twitter: @BrJCancer

Cancer Research UK

Related Cancer Articles:

Radiotherapy for invasive breast cancer increases the risk of second primary lung cancer
East Asian female breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy have a higher risk of developing second primary lung cancer.
Cancer genomics continued: Triple negative breast cancer and cancer immunotherapy
Continuing PLOS Medicine's special issue on cancer genomics, Christos Hatzis of Yale University, New Haven, Conn., USA and colleagues describe a new subtype of triple negative breast cancer that may be more amenable to treatment than other cases of this difficult-to-treat disease.
Metabolite that promotes cancer cell transformation and colorectal cancer spread identified
Osaka University researchers revealed that the metabolite D-2-hydroxyglurate (D-2HG) promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells, leading them to develop features of lower adherence to neighboring cells, increased invasiveness, and greater likelihood of metastatic spread.
UH Cancer Center researcher finds new driver of an aggressive form of brain cancer
University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers have identified an essential driver of tumor cell invasion in glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer that can occur at any age.
UH Cancer Center researchers develop algorithm to find precise cancer treatments
University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers developed a computational algorithm to analyze 'Big Data' obtained from tumor samples to better understand and treat cancer.
More Cancer News and Cancer Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.