New report discusses role of polyphenols, found in coffee, in reducing CVD risk

March 19, 2019

A new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) titled 'Coffee, polyphenols and cardiovascular disease' highlights the potential role of polyphenols - which are found in coffee, cocoa and wine, as well as other plant-based foods - in reducing the risk of CVD.

The report, authored by Professor Kjeld Hermansen, Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark discusses the research that suggests that there is an association between the consumption of polyphenols and a reduction in CVD prevalence.1,2

Coffee is one of the main sources of polyphenols in the diet; the compounds naturally occur in the beverage and contribute to its unique flavours and aromas.1 In recent years there has been growing academic interest in the role of polyphenols in health through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

The new ISIC report authored by Prof Hermansen discusses the range of potential cardio protective functions of polyphenols and the mechanisms involved.

Key research findings highlighted in the report include:
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To read the report titled, 'Coffee, polyphenols and cardiovascular disease' click [LINK TO BE AVAILABLE ONCE REPORT IS PUBLISHED].

Readers interested in finding out more about coffee & health can visit: http://www.coffeeandhealth.org

Notes to editorsAuthor of the reportReferences

1. Williamson G. (2017) The role of polyphenols in modern nutrition. Nutr Bull, 42(3):226-235.

2. Gomaz J.G. (2016) Potential Role of Polyphenols in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases: Molecular Bases. Curr Med Chem,23(2):115-28.

3. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) (2011) Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to caffeine and increased fat oxidation leading to a reduction in body fat mass (ID 735, 1484), increased energy expenditure leading to a reduction in body weight (ID 1487), increased alertness (ID 736, 1101, 1187, 1485, 1491, 2063, 2103) and increased attention (ID 736, 1485, 1491, 2375) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/20061. EFSA Journal, 9(4):2054.

About ISIC

The Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) is a not-for-profit organization, established in 1990 and devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to "coffee and health." Since 2003 ISIC also supports a pan-European education programme, working in partnership with national coffee associations in nine countries to convey current scientific knowledge on "coffee and health" to health care professionals.

ISIC's activities are focused on: ISIC respects scientific research ethics in all its activities. ISIC's communications are based on sound science and rely on scientific studies derived from peer-reviewed scientific journals and other publications. ISIC members are six of the major European coffee companies: illycaffè, Jacobs Douwe Egberts, Lavazza, Nestlé, Paulig, and Tchibo.

About coffeeandhealth.org

The website http://www.coffeeandhealth.org is a science-based resource developed for health care and other professional audiences and provides the latest information and research into coffee, caffeine and health.

Follow us on twitter: @coffeeandhealth

The Institute of Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC)

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