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New report discusses role of polyphenols, found in coffee, in reducing CVD risk

March 19, 2019

A new report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) titled 'Coffee, polyphenols and cardiovascular disease' highlights the potential role of polyphenols - which are found in coffee, cocoa and wine, as well as other plant-based foods - in reducing the risk of CVD.

The report, authored by Professor Kjeld Hermansen, Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark discusses the research that suggests that there is an association between the consumption of polyphenols and a reduction in CVD prevalence.1,2

Coffee is one of the main sources of polyphenols in the diet; the compounds naturally occur in the beverage and contribute to its unique flavours and aromas.1 In recent years there has been growing academic interest in the role of polyphenols in health through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

The new ISIC report authored by Prof Hermansen discusses the range of potential cardio protective functions of polyphenols and the mechanisms involved.

Key research findings highlighted in the report include:
  • Epidemiological research suggests that there is an association between the consumption of polyphenols and reduction in CVD prevalence.1,2
  • Polyphenols may have a range of cardio protective functions but the precise mechanisms are not yet fully understood. It is suggested that they may alter cholesterol absorption and the processing of fats in the body, and reduce inflammation.1,2
  • Coffee is one of the main sources of polyphenols in the diet.1
-end-
To read the report titled, 'Coffee, polyphenols and cardiovascular disease' click [LINK TO BE AVAILABLE ONCE REPORT IS PUBLISHED].

Readers interested in finding out more about coffee & health can visit: http://www.coffeeandhealth.org

Notes to editors
  • Moderate coffee consumption can be defined as 3-5 cups per day, based on the European Food Safety Authority's review of caffeine safety.3
  • To read a full overview of coffee and cardiovascular disease, click here.
Author of the report
  • Professor Kjeld Hermansen, Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark

References

1. Williamson G. (2017) The role of polyphenols in modern nutrition. Nutr Bull, 42(3):226-235.

2. Gomaz J.G. (2016) Potential Role of Polyphenols in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases: Molecular Bases. Curr Med Chem,23(2):115-28.

3. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) (2011) Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to caffeine and increased fat oxidation leading to a reduction in body fat mass (ID 735, 1484), increased energy expenditure leading to a reduction in body weight (ID 1487), increased alertness (ID 736, 1101, 1187, 1485, 1491, 2063, 2103) and increased attention (ID 736, 1485, 1491, 2375) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/20061. EFSA Journal, 9(4):2054.

About ISIC

The Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) is a not-for-profit organization, established in 1990 and devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to "coffee and health." Since 2003 ISIC also supports a pan-European education programme, working in partnership with national coffee associations in nine countries to convey current scientific knowledge on "coffee and health" to health care professionals.

ISIC's activities are focused on:
  • the study of scientific matters related to "coffee and health"
  • the collection and evaluation of studies and scientific information about "coffee and health"
  • the support of independent scientific research on "coffee and health"
  • active dissemination of balanced "coffee and health" scientific research and knowledge to a broad range of stakeholders.
ISIC respects scientific research ethics in all its activities. ISIC's communications are based on sound science and rely on scientific studies derived from peer-reviewed scientific journals and other publications. ISIC members are six of the major European coffee companies: illycaffè, Jacobs Douwe Egberts, Lavazza, Nestlé, Paulig, and Tchibo.

About coffeeandhealth.org

The website http://www.coffeeandhealth.org is a science-based resource developed for health care and other professional audiences and provides the latest information and research into coffee, caffeine and health.

Follow us on twitter: @coffeeandhealth

The Institute of Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC)

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