Nav: Home

Long-term limitations imposed on patients with pulmonary embolism

March 20, 2017

A multi-centre clinical study, led by Dr. Susan Kahn at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH), determined that nearly half of the patients who suffer a pulmonary embolism (PE) -- a blood clot in the lung -- experience long term limitations to their capacity for physical activity and that this had a negative impact on their quality of life. This research, published in Chest, is the first to demonstrate that PE may have a lasting effect on patients. "Our clinical experience told us that some patients who'd had a pulmonary embolism suffered from shortness of breath and chronic fatigue long after the PE had been treated and resolved," explained Dr. Kahn, who is founder and director of the Centre of Excellence in Thrombosis and Anticoagulation Care (CETAC) at the JGH, and an epidemiologist at the Lady Davis Institute at the JGH. "Our study revealed that 47% of participants showed a significant reduction in their physical stamina." One-hundred patients were followed over the course of a year following treatment for PE. They answered quality of life questionnaires and participated in a number of physiological tests to measure their cardiopulmonary functions. All of the participants were generally healthy when they experienced their PE, so it was surprising that nearly half performed below 80% of their predicted peak oxygen uptake (a standard measure for cardiopulmonary exercise testing) one year later. These patients also scored lower in variables used to measure quality of life.

"One of the tests we use is to see how far a patient can walk in six minutes, which is a basic measure of mobility and stamina. When someone is limited in performing this test, it is really something that is interfering with their normal day-to-day functioning," said Dr. Kahn, a Professor of Medicine at McGill University, who is recognized as a world leader in research and treating patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE).

The underlying cause of the PE did not seem to be a predictor of whether a person may experience long-term repercussions. The study did reveal that men were three times more likely to have adverse effects, younger patients fared worse, as did more overweight patients and smokers.

Though further study is required, the outcome of this research suggests that patients with PE may benefit from some form of exercise rehabilitation as part of their recovery.
-end-
In addition to Dr. Kahn, Drs. Andrew Hirsch and Lawrence Rudski from the Department of Medicine and Dr. Christopher Rush from the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the JGH contributed to the study.

March is Deep Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month. CETAC is hosting an information kiosk at the entrance to Pavilion K at the JGH on Wednesday March 22 from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm. The public is invited to stop by to learn more about these disorders, as well as to test their knowledge, win prizes and enjoy tea.

For further information or to arrange interviews with Dr. Kahn, contact:

Tod Hoffman
Research Communications Officer
Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital
Office: 514-340-8222, ext. 28661
Cell: 514-433-3500
thoffman@jgh.mcgill.ca

For further information about the Lady Davis Institute, visit http: http://www.ladydavis.ca

For further information about the Jewish General Hospital, visit http://www.jgh.ca

McGill University

Related Physical Activity Articles:

The benefits of physical activity for older adults
New findings published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports reveal how physically active older adults benefit from reduced risks of early death, breast and prostate cancer, fractures, recurrent falls, functional limitations, cognitive decline, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and depression.
Physical activity may protect against new episodes of depression
Increased levels of physical activity can significantly reduce the odds of depression, even among people who are genetically predisposed to the condition.
Is physical activity always good for the heart?
Physical activity is thought to be our greatest ally in the fight against cardiovascular disease.
Physical activity in lessons improves students' attainment
Students who take part in physical exercises like star jumps or running on the spot during school lessons do better in tests than peers who stick to sedentary learning, according to a UCL-led study.
Physical activity may attenuate menopause-associated atherogenic changes
Leisure-time physical activity is associated with a healthier blood lipid profile in menopausal women, but it doesn't seem to entirely offset the unfavorable lipid profile changes associated with the menopausal transition.
Are US adults meeting physical activity guidelines?
The proportion of US adults adhering to the 'Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans' from the US Department of Health and Human Services didn't significantly improve between 2007 and 2016 but time spent sitting increased.
Children from disadvantaged backgrounds do less vigorous physical activity
Children from disadvantaged backgrounds and certain ethnic minority backgrounds, including from Pakistani and Bangladeshi backgrounds, have lower levels of vigorous physical activity, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge.
Light, physical activity reduces brain aging
Incremental physical activity, even at light intensity, is associated with larger brain volume and healthy brain aging.
Decline in physical activity often starts as early as age 7
Overall physical activity starts to decline already around the age of school entry.
Is it ever too late for adults to benefit from physical activity?
It may never be too late for adults to become physically active and enjoy some health benefits.
More Physical Activity News and Physical Activity Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.