Nav: Home

New technologies in the air by NTU Singapore and Camfil to improve indoor air quality

March 20, 2017

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Swedish company Camfil, a global leader in the air filtration industry, are collaborating to develop innovative solutions to improve air filtration efficiency and indoor air quality.

The partnership will see the testing of various air filter technologies on NTU's buildings, focussing on their performance in tropical weather. These will be tested on NTU's 200-hectare campus which is already a living lab for many environment-friendly research projects ranging from sustainability solutions to electromobility.

Leading NTU's efforts will be the Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N), who together with Camfil's experts will investigate the impact of indoor air quality on the cognitive performance of adults, which includes assessing their learning performance, memory abilities and reaction time.

Findings from the joint research projects are expected to shed light on the optimal indoor environment for improved cognitive health and general well-being of building occupants.

NTU Chief of Staff and Vice President (Research), Professor Lam Khin Yong said, "The research partnership between NTU and Camfil is highly relevant in today's urban cities as people spend more than 90 per cent of their time indoors, whether at home or at work. In urban centres, assessments on indoor air quality are also central in determining the well-being of workplaces. It is our aim that the collaboration will result in innovative solutions that can help improve the general well-being and productivity of building occupants."

Camfil, headquartered in Sweden, is a global leader in the air filtration industry with more than half a century of experience.

Mr Alain Bérard, Executive Vice President - Marketing and Products, Camfil said, "Camfil's mission has been to develop and deliver innovative clean air solutions combined with optimised energy efficiency. We share these objectives with NTU Singapore, and our collaboration will lead to significant breakthroughs in our field of activity."

Research to focus on tropical climate

In urban areas, people who spend a lot of time in enclosed buildings are susceptible to pollutants from sources such as furniture, paints, carpets and electronics.

The levels of indoor pollutants such as particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide, carbon dioxide and allergens will determine the air quality. Exposure to a high concentration of indoor air pollutants may affect productivity in the short term and damage one's health in the long term.

Through field studies, the researchers aim to find out the efficiency of general ventilation devices and systems.

Investigations on different air filter solutions will also provide a good platform for the development of a filtration standard for tropical climates.
-end-
Media contact:

Ang Hui Min
Assistant Manager
Corporate Communications Office
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Tel: +65 6592 3557
Email: huimin@ntu.edu.sg

Jayant Kaushal
Director Product and Project Management Office
Comfort and Air Cleaner - Asia Pacific and Middle East
Camfil Singapore
Tel: +65 6460 0450
Email: Jayant.Kaushal@camfil.com

About Nanyang Technological University

A research-intensive public university, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has 33,500 undergraduate and postgraduate students in the colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences, and its Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It also has a medical school, the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London.

NTU is also home to world-class autonomous institutes - the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering - and various leading research centres such as the Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Energy Research Institute @ NTU (ERI@N) and the Institute on Asian Consumer Insight (ACI).

Ranked 13th in the world, NTU has also been ranked the world's top young university for the last three years running. The University's main campus has been named one of the Top 15 Most Beautiful in the World. NTU also has a campus in Novena, Singapore's medical district.

For more information, visit http://www.ntu.edu.sg

About Camfil

Camfil is a global leader in the air filtration industry with more than half a century of experience in developing and manufacturing sustainable clean air solutions that protect people, processes and the environment against harmful airborne particles, gases and emissions. These solutions are used globally to benefit human health, increase performance and reduce energy consumption in a wide range of air filtration applications.

Our 26 manufacturing plants, six R&D sites, local sales offices and 3,800 employees provide service and support to our customers around the world. Camfil is headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden. Group sales total more than SEK 6 billion per year.

For more information, visit http://www.camfil.com

Nanyang Technological University

Related Air Quality Articles:

Can poor air quality make you gain weight?
A new study links air pollution to changes in the human gut microbiome which could fuel diabetes, obesity and inflammatory bowel diseases like colitis and Crohn's disease.
TRAX air quality study expands
In a new study published in Urban Science, researchers including Daniel Mendoza and Logan Mitchell report the latest from the TRAX Observation Project, including data validation studies that bolster the data's value for other researchers and three case studies from recent events showcasing the abilities of the mobile air quality sensors.
Automobile law in Japan has improved air quality
A law passed in Japan in 1992 aimed to improve urban air quality by banning vehicles that violated certain emission standards from being registered in designated areas.
Air quality tests need simplifying to help reduce dangerous emissions
New methods of testing and simulating air quality should be considered in order to help policy makers have a more accurate understanding of how emissions affect air pollution levels, new research suggests.
How are Utah's dry lakes impacting air quality and human health?
A new study from BYU reveals that 90 percent of Utah urban dust comes from dry lakebeds, which not only impacts air quality but also impacting soil and what can grow in it.
A large part of the school buildings in Andalusia does not have adequate air quality
A high percentage of schools buildings in Andalusia does not have the necessary mechanical ventilation equipment or filtration systems in place, so air has to be renewed by means of infiltrations or opening the windows.
Study: Actually, potted plants don't improve indoor air quality
Plants can help spruce up a home or office space, but claims about their ability to improve the air quality are vastly overstated, according to research out of Drexel University.
House developers could be the secret weapon to improving air quality
House developers and urban planners could be the unlikely heroes in the battle against the 'new tobacco' -- air pollution -- say researchers from the University of Surrey.
Treat citizens as partners, not participants, to improve air quality research
Encouraging citizens to take part in almost every step of scientific air quality research improves their understanding of how air pollution affects their health, finds a new study from the University of Surrey.
Monitoring air quality after Fourth of July fireworks
The U.S. recently celebrated the Fourth of July with dazzling fireworks displays in many cities.
More Air Quality News and Air Quality Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.