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Data published in Nature Methods demonstrate breakthrough ability to accurately detect somatic single nucleotide variations in single cells

March 20, 2017

SingulOmics Corporation, a recently established genomic research and service company, announced today the publication of data validating the company's core mission of producing a new, high quality amplification method and computational pipeline for single cell sequencing. The data demonstrate that the company's new system -- AccuSomatic Amplification for Single Cell Sequencing -- enables accurate detection of somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in single cells not possible with any prior methods. The data are presented in a paper, "Accurate identification of single nucleotide variants in whole genome amplified single cells," published online on March 20, 2017 in Nature Methods (doi:10.1038/nmeth.4227).

AccuSomatic Amplification for Single Cell Sequencing, the result of years of research conducted at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, enables the discovery of true somatic SNVs in single cells that could not be accurately detected by any prior method. While single cell sequencing holds great promise for studying genetic heterogeneity in cancer and normal tissues, existing methods suffer from multiple sources of artifacts that can result in more than 20,000 false somatic SNV calls per cell and >90% false positive results. According to the research data, AccuSomatic Amplification eliminates >99% of errors in somatic SNV calls while maintaining the same detection sensitivity.

"This is really a game changer for our research. We are interested in studying low, physiological levels of somatic SNVs and other mutations in single cells, but these were simply drowning in the high background we experienced with published protocols or commercially available systems," stated Jan Vijg, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and an investor and co-founder of SingulOmics. "We are entering a single cell genomics era as the cost of human genome sequencing plummets. This new method allows researchers to unlock the full potential of single cell sequencing in cancer, drug development, and aging research and greatly expands the capability of researchers to explore the landscapes of somatic mutations in human and other organisms beyond the reach of other amplification techniques available to date."
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About SingulOmics

SingulOmics Corporation was established in 2016 in New York as a genomics research and service company specializing in the emerging field of single-cell omics. Building on the unmatched expertise in single-cell genomics, transcriptomics and epigenomics developed since the mid-2000s at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the company's mission is to develop and provide high-quality innovative single-cell services to academic and industrial communities around the world. In addition to AccuSomatic Amplification for Single Cell Sequencing, Singulomics also offers single cell whole genome bisulfite sequencing service. For more information, visit http://www.singulomics.com.

Media Contact:

Scott Rieger
Access IR PR
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SingulOmics Corporation

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