Extreme winter weather, such as 'Beast from the East', can be linked to solar cycle

March 20, 2018

Periods of extreme cold winter weather and perilous snowfall, similar to those that gripped the UK in a deep freeze with the arrival of the 'Beast from the East', could be linked to the solar cycle, pioneering new research has shown.

A new study, led by Dr Indrani Roy from the University of Exeter, has revealed when the solar cycle is in its 'weaker' phase, there are warm spells across the Arctic in winter, as well as heavy snowfall across the Eurasian sector.

The research is published in leading journal Scientific Reports, a Nature Publication, on Tuesday, 20 March 2018.

Dr Roy, form Exeter's Mathematics department said: "In spite of all other influences and complexities, it is still possible to segregate a strong influence from the sun. There are reductions of sea-ice in the Arctic and a growth in the Eurasian sector is observed in recent winters. This study shows those trends are related and current weaker solar cycle is contributing to that."

The new study observed that during periods when the winter solar Sunspot Number (SSN) falls below average, the Arctic warming extends from the lower troposphere to high up in the upper stratosphere. On the other hand there is a cooling when SSN is above average.

It explored how the 11-year solar cycle - a periodic change in the sun's activity including changes in the levels of solar UV radiation and changes in the SSNs - can be linked with the Polar vortex and Arctic Oscillation phenomenon, which affects winter Arctic and Eurasian climate.

It subsequently can influence weather conditions in Europe, including the UK, Scandinavia and Asia.

Solar cyclic variability can modulate winter Arctic climate is published in Scientific Reports.
-end-


University of Exeter

Related Solar Cycle Articles from Brightsurf:

Who is driving whom? Climate and carbon cycle in perpetual interaction
The current climate crisis underlines that carbon cycle perturbations can cause significant climate change.

Uncovering new understanding of Earth's carbon cycle
A new study led by a University of Alberta PhD student--and published in Nature--is examining the Earth's carbon cycle in new depth, using diamonds as breadcrumbs of insight into some of Earth's deepest geologic mechanisms.

Understanding the 'deep-carbon cycle'
New geologic findings about the makeup of the Earth's mantle are helping scientists better understand long-term climate stability and even how seismic waves move through the planet's layers.

Busting Up the Infection Cycle of Hepatitis B
Researchers at the University of Delaware have gained new understanding of the virus that causes hepatitis B and the ''spiky ball'' that encloses its genetic blueprint.

Merging solar cell and liquid battery produces long-lasting solar storage
Combining liquid chemical battery technology with perovskite solar cells has led to a new record in solar energy conversion within a single device.

Merging solar cell and liquid battery produces efficient, long-lasting solar storage
Chemists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and their collaborators have created a highly efficient and long-lasting solar flow battery, a way to generate, store and redeliver renewable electricity from the sun in one device.

NYU Abu Dhabi researchers measure motions in the Sun to explain the solar cycle
In a newly-published study, researchers from the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) and colleagues used helioseismology and analyzed several data sources to find that the Sun's meridional flow is a single cell in each hemisphere that carries plasma toward the Sun's equator 200 thousand km below the surface.

Motions in the Sun reveal inner workings of sunspot cycle
The Sun's convection zone plays a key role in the generation and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field.

Removing the novel coronavirus from the water cycle
Researchers at UC Riverside and the University of Salerno have called for more research to determine the best ways to keep SARS-CoV-19 out of the water cycle.

Solar wind samples suggest new physics of massive solar ejections
A new study led by the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa has helped refine understanding of the amount of hydrogen, helium and other elements present in violent outbursts from the Sun, and other types of solar 'wind,' a stream of ionized atoms ejected from the Sun.

Read More: Solar Cycle News and Solar Cycle Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.