Nav: Home

Drinking hot tea linked with elevated risk of esophageal cancer

March 20, 2019

Previous studies have revealed a link between hot tea drinking and risk of esophageal cancer, but until now, no study has examined this association using prospectively and objectively measured tea drinking temperature. A new International Journal of Cancer study achieved this by following 50,045 individuals aged 40 to 75 years for a median of 10 years.

During follow-up, 317 new cases of esophageal cancer were identified. Compared with drinking less than 700 ml of tea per day at less than 60°C, drinking 700 ml per day or more at a higher temperature (60°C or higher) was associated with a 90 percent higher risk of esophageal cancer.

"Many people enjoy drinking tea, coffee, or other hot beverages. However, according to our report, drinking very hot tea can increase the risk of esophageal cancer, and it is therefore advisable to wait until hot beverages cool down before drinking," said lead author Dr. Farhad Islami, of the American Cancer Society.
-end-


Wiley

Related Esophageal Cancer Articles:

Portable 'electronic nose' can accurately pick up esophageal cancer precursor
A portable 'electronic nose' can accurately pick up the precursor condition to food pipe (esophageal) cancer, known as Barrett's esophagus, indicates a proof of principle study, published online in the journal Gut.
A new machine learning approach detects esophageal cancer better than current methods
Dartmouth scientists have proposed a new machine learning model for identification of esophageal cancer that could open new avenues for applying deep learning to digital pathology.
Lymph nodes can predict survival in patients with esophageal cancer
It is difficult for physicians to estimate recurrence and survival in patients with esophageal cancer.
New model improves staging and risk predictions for esophageal cancer patients
A new nomogram for assessing metastatic risk in esophageal cancer patients shows promise for more accurate risk-stratification, which is particularly relevant for stage T2 patients.
Combo of virotherapy and radiotherapy shows early promise in patients with esophageal cancer
The experimental oncolytic adenovirus telomelysin (OBP-301) in combination with radiotherapy was safe and showed early clinical efficacy in vulnerable patients with esophageal cancer, according to results from a phase I clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
Drinking hot tea linked with elevated risk of esophageal cancer
Previous studies have revealed a link between hot tea drinking and risk of esophageal cancer, but until now, no study has examined this association using prospectively and objectively measured tea drinking temperature.
Newly identified drug targets could open door for esophageal cancer therapeutics
Blocking two molecular pathways that send signals inside cancer cells could stave off esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), the most common esophageal malignancy in the United States, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.
Test for esophageal cancer could save millions of lives
Cancer of the esophagus claims more than 400,000 lives around the world each year.
Genome offers clues to esophageal cancer disparity
A change in the genome of Caucasians could explain much-higher rates of the most common type of esophageal cancer in this population, a new study finds.
Detecting esophageal cancer cells
Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington's College of Nursing and Health Innovation have developed a new nanoparticle-based platform for simultaneous imaging and treatment of esophageal cancer.
More Esophageal Cancer News and Esophageal Cancer Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.