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Knowledge and perceptions of COVID-19 among the general public in the US, UK

March 20, 2020

Below please find links to new coronavirus-related content published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. All coronavirus-related content published in Annals of Internal Medicine is free to the public. A complete collection is available at https://annals.org/aim/pages/coronavirus-content.

Also new in this issue:

Knowledge and perceptions of coronavirus disease 2019 among the general public in the United States and the United Kingdom: A cross-sectional online survey

Pascal Geldsetzer MD PhD MPH

Brief Research Report

Abstract: http://annals.org/aim/article/doi/10.7326/M20-0912

Media contact: To speak with lead author, Pascal Geldsetzer MD PhD MPH, please contact Tracie White at traciew@stanford.edu.
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American College of Physicians

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