Society of Interventional Radiology hosts 37th Annual Scientific Meeting

March 21, 2012

The Society of Interventional Radiology will feature minimally invasive scientific advances and new discoveries that may change the way diseases are treated at its 37th Annual Scientific Meeting March 24-29 at San Francisco's Moscone Center. The theme of the meeting is "IR Evidence," chosen to reflect interventional radiology's gathering, presenting and discussing results of care-changing investigations.

Highlights of embargoed key interventional radiology studies being presented are listed below. Illustrations and broadcast-quality footage are available for some stories; interviews with lead researchers can be arranged on request.

Interventional Radiology Treatment and MS Symptoms
Advancing MS Research: Possible Symptom Relief


An estimated 400,000 people in the United States have been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, or MS--generally thought of as an incurable, disabling neurologic disease. Is there a minimally invasive treatment that can provide relief to individuals with hard-to-manage symptoms of MS? (Embargoed for release on Sunday, March 25, at 9 a.m. Eastern) B-roll, medical images and illustrations are available.

Improving Quality of Life: Positive Impact in Treating Venous Lesions

A single-center experience reports on how abnormalities can be safely treated with angioplasty of the jugular and azygos veins in the neck and chest--perhaps providing hope in mitigating MS symptoms. (Embargoed for release on Sunday, March 25, at 9 a.m. Eastern) B-roll, medical images and illustrations are available.

Men's Health
Bringing New Potential Breakthrough for Enlarged Prostate: Current Treatments May Not Work


A man's prostate can slowly grow larger with age due to a noncancerous process called benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH. Annually, 250,000 men undergo surgery to reduce prostate size because medication doesn't work for them. Could an interventional radiology treatment offer men a faster recovery--on an outpatient basis--with no bladder catheters, reduced symptoms, improved urination and fewer potential side effects? (Embargoed for release on Sunday, March 25, at 9 a.m. Eastern) Medical images are available.

Cancer Advances
Offering Hope: New Treatment Option for Inoperable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer


Annually, 44,000 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and approximately 37,390 people will die of the disease, according to the American Cancer Society. Can a new interventional radiology procedure that pummels inoperable tumors with electrical pulses help those with inoperable locally advanced pancreatic cancer? (Embargoed for release on Monday, March 26, at 9 a.m. Eastern) Medical images are available.

Fighting Metastatic Breast Cancer: Stop Tumors Cold

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women: there are 1 million new cases, killing 370,000 people worldwide each year--and approximately 10,000 to 15,000 cases of stage IV breast cancer occur in the United States annually. Interventional radiologists say that after mastectomy, radiation and chemotherapy it is time to try something new and are introducing the "fourth leg on the stool of cancer care." (Embargoed for release on Monday, March 26, at 9 a.m. Eastern) Medical images are available.

New Science
Exploring Possibilities: Minimally Invasive Ways to Help People Lose Weight and Repair Sore Backs


What are some of the new treatments and new science coming in the future from interventional radiologists? Because interventional radiologists are experts at finding new uses for proven therapies, these vascular specialists continue to pioneer new applications that might have future use in treating obesity--and in providing symptom relief to those with degenerative disc disease. (Embargoed for release on Monday, March 26, at 9 a.m. Eastern) Medical images are available.

Deep Vein Thrombosis
Fighting Post-thrombotic Syndrome: Good News When Told No Treatment Options Available


Blood clots within the legs are a major problem in the United States, affecting up to 600,000 individuals annually. Despite appropriate medical management, as many as 50 percent of individuals with DVT that affects the large veins in the lower leg and thigh will go on to develop post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Interventional radiologists report (during national DVT Awareness Month) on ways to reduce disabling symptoms and improve the quality of life for those afflicted with a long-term complication of deep vein thrombosis. (Embargoed for release on Monday, March 26, at 9 a.m. Eastern) Medical images, illustrations and video are available.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Treating Ruptured AAAs: Endovascular Repair in Emergency Settings


In the United States, 9 percent of the population over the age of 65 years has an abdominal aortic aneurysm, and there are 15,000 deaths per year from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Could a minimally invasive interventional radiology treatment for life-threatening ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) be the answer for people with peripheral arterial disease who may harbor this dangerous condition? (Embargoed for release on Sunday, March 25, at 9 a.m. Eastern) Medical illustrations are available.

Radiation Safety
Providing New Guidelines: Reduce Radiation Exposure, Cut Overall Lung Cancer Deaths


Because interventional radiologists see patient care and safety for patients and health care professionals as top priorities, they report on ways to reduce per-procedure radiation dose--and still provide high-quality images. (Embargoed for release on Sunday, March 25, at 9 a.m. Eastern) Medical images are available.
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To register for the Annual Scientific Meeting, visit www.SIRmeeting.org. Press registration is complimentary to credentialed media. For press registration only, contact Ellen Acconcia, (703) 460-5582, eacconcia@SIRweb.org">eacconcia@SIRweb.org, or Maryann Verrillo, (703) 460-5572, mverrillo@SIRweb.org.

SIR will hold two press conferences, from 9:30 a.m. (Pacific) on March 25 and from 9:30 a.m. (Pacific) on March 26, featuring an overview of the latest research and discoveries from the world of interventional radiology.

For more information about the Society of Interventional Radiology and its 37th Annual Scientific Meeting, visit online at www.SIRweb.org or www.SIRmeeting.org.

About the Society of Interventional Radiology

Interventional radiologists are physicians who specialize in minimally invasive, targeted treatments. They offer the most in-depth knowledge of the least invasive treatments available coupled with diagnostic and clinical experience across all specialties. They use X-ray, MRI and other imaging to advance a catheter in the body, such as in an artery, to treat at the source of the disease internally. As the inventors of angioplasty and the catheter-delivered stent, which were first used in the legs to treat peripheral arterial disease, interventional radiologists pioneered minimally invasive modern medicine. Today, interventional oncology is a growing specialty area of interventional radiology. Interventional radiologists can deliver treatments for cancer directly to the tumor without significant side effects or damage to nearby normal tissue.

Many conditions that once required surgery can be treated less invasively by interventional radiologists. Interventional radiology treatments offer less risk, less pain and less recovery time compared to open surgery. Visit www.SIRweb.org.

The Society of Interventional Radiology is holding its 37th Annual Scientific Meeting March 24-29 at Moscone Center, San Francisco. The theme of the meeting is "IR Evidence," chosen to reflect interventional radiology's gathering, presenting and discussing results of care-changing investigations.

Society of Interventional Radiology

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