EARTH: Rise of community remote sensing

March 22, 2011

Alexandria, VA - If you ask someone involved in community remote sensing to define the emerging field, the most likely response will be a chuckle followed by "That's a hard question to answer..." At its core, the movement is about remote sensing - collecting data from afar. Remote sensing has revolutionized science and Earth monitoring, but it fails to collect data at the hyper-local level. And that's where the community comes in.

Learn how you can use handheld technologies such as smartphones, GPS devices and digital cameras to help scientists in the Trends column "The Rise of Community Remote Sensing" in the April issue of EARTH. And don't miss our stories on topics such as how microbes survive for tens of thousands of years in salt crystals, how black carbon affects climate, and whether science education is passing or failing in the U.S. in the April issue. Also be sure to check out our story about discovering dinosaur tracks in a New Jersey housing development.
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These stories and many more can be found in the April issue of EARTH, now available digitally (http://www.earthmagazine.org/digital/) or in print on your local newsstands.

For further information on the April featured article, go to http://www.earthmagazine.org/earth/article/429-7db-3-15 .

Keep up to date with the latest happenings in earth, energy and environment news with EARTH magazine, available on local newsstands or online at http://www.earthmagazine.org/. Published by the American Geological Institute, EARTH is your source for the science behind the headlines.

American Geosciences Institute

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