Wildlife biologist named Roger Tory Peterson Medal recipient, speaker

March 23, 2009

Russell Mittermeier, renowned wildlife biologist and president of Conservation International, has been selected to receive the 12th annual Roger Tory Peterson Medal presented by the Harvard Museum of Natural History (HMNH). Mittermeier will deliver the Roger Tory Peterson Memorial Lecture on April 5.

Renowned for his work in developing criteria for biodiversity "hotspots" as a conservation priority, Mittermeier is considered an expert on such topics as biological diversity and its value to humanity, ecosystem conservation, tropical biology, and species conservation. In his lecture titled "Conserving the World's Biodiversity: How the Climate Crisis Could Both Hurt and Help," Mittermeier will discuss the major extinction crisis facing the planet, as well as the management and conservation strategies that give him hope for the future.

In addition to his work at Conservation International, Mittermeier has served as chairman of the International Union for Conservation of Nature's World Conservation Species Survival Commission's Primate Specialist Group since 1977, and as the chairman of the World Bank's Task Force of Biological Diversity in 1988 and 1989. Prior to coming to Conservation International, he was vice president for science at the World Wildlife Fund.

Mittermeier has conducted fieldwork for more than 30 years on three continents and in more than 20 countries, primarily in the tropics of Brazil, Suriname, and Madagascar. His fieldwork has focused on primates, protected areas, and other conservation issues. He has formally discovered several monkey species, and was honored for his work in Madagascar in 2006 with the naming of a newly discovered species of mouse lemur. He has authored over 225 papers and eight books, including "Lemurs of Madagascar," a comprehensive field guide to Madagascar's flagship species. Mittermeier received his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1971 and his Ph.D. from Harvard University in biological anthropology in 1977.

HMNH inaugurated the memorial lecture in 1997 to keep alive the memory of the pioneering naturalist and author of the legendary "Peterson Field Guide to Birds." This annual event celebrates and perpetuates Peterson's tireless efforts to conserve the planet's biological diversity. Past recipients of the medal have included E.O. Wilson, Jared M. Diamond, Paul R. Ehrlich, Bruce Babbitt, Richard Leakey, Peter Matthiessen, David Attenborough, Roger Bateman, David Suzuki, Jane Goodall, and Jeremy Jackson.
-end-


Harvard University

Related Biodiversity Articles from Brightsurf:

Biodiversity hypothesis called into question
How can we explain the fact that no single species predominates?

Using the past to maintain future biodiversity
New research shows that safeguarding species and ecosystems and the benefits they provide for society against future climatic change requires effective solutions which can only be formulated from reliable forecasts.

Changes in farming urgent to rescue biodiversity
Humans depend on farming for their survival but this activity takes up more than one-third of the world's landmass and endangers 62% of all threatened species.

Predicting the biodiversity of rivers
Biodiversity and thus the state of river ecosystems can now be predicted by combining environmental DNA with hydrological methods, researchers from the University of Zurich and Eawag have found.

About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet
Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator.

Bargain-hunting for biodiversity
The best bargains for conserving some of the world's most vulnerable salamanders and other vertebrate species can be found in Central Texas and the Appalachians, according to new conservation tools developed at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Researchers solve old biodiversity mystery
The underlying cause for why some regions are home to an extremely large number of animal species may be found in the evolutionary adaptations of species, and how they limit their dispersion to specific natural habitats.

Biodiversity offsetting is contentious -- here's an alternative
A new approach to compensate for the impact of development may be an effective alternative to biodiversity offsetting -- and help nations achieve international biodiversity targets.

Biodiversity yields financial returns
Farmers could increase their revenues by increasing biodiversity on their land.

Biodiversity and wind energy
The location and operation of wind energy plants are often in direct conflict with the legal protection of endangered species.

Read More: Biodiversity News and Biodiversity Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.