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Columbia U. dental scientist receives IADR Award for periodontal research

March 23, 2017

NEW YORK, NY (March 23, 2017) -- On March 22, 2017, the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) awarded its 2017 Distinguished Scientist Award in Basic Research in Periodontal Disease to Panos N. Papapanou, DDS, PhD, professor and chair of the Section of Oral, Diagnostic and Rehabilitation Sciences of the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine.

He was recognized at the Opening Ceremonies of the 95th IADR/AADR/CADR General Session & Exhibition in San Francisco, Calif. The award, given annually to a researcher chosen by previous honorees, recognizes Dr. Papapanou's diverse and prolific contributions to areas of study including the epidemiology of periodontal diseases, their pathobiology, the assessment of microbial and host-derived risk factors, as well as the diseases' role as health stressor in heart disease and pregnancy complications.

"Dr. Papapanou has made remarkable contributions to our understanding of periodontal diseases in the context of a person's overall health, as well as elucidated the connections with other conditions," said Christian S. Stohler, DMD, DrMedDent, dean of the College of Dental Medicine. "This is a well-deserved honor, and we at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine are proud to count him among our faculty."

Dr. Papapanou's work, funded by the National Institutes of Health, foundations, and industry has garnered awards including the IADR's 2015 William Gies Award in Clinical Research and the highly prestigious 2016 Yngve Ericsson Prize for Research in Preventive Odontology, which the Swedish Patent Revenue Fund awards only once every three years. In addition to his research, Dr. Papapanou chairs the school's Section of Oral, Diagnostic, and Rehabilitation Sciences and directs the Division of Periodontics. He serves on the advisory board of several scientific journals, is a fellow of the American College of Dentists and previously served as president and councilor of the Periodontal Research Group of the International Association of Dental Research.
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Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, among the first university-affiliated dental schools in the United States, was founded in 1916. As part of a world-class medical center, the school trains general dentists and dental specialists in a setting that emphasizes the interconnection between oral health care and overall health for both individuals and communities. The school supports research to advance personalized, evidence-based oral health care and contribute to the professional knowledge base for future leaders in the field. In its commitment to service learning, the school provides dental care to underserved communities of Northern Manhattan and also engages in dental and oral health care capacity-building initiatives abroad. Its faculty has played a leadership role in advancing the inclusion of oral health programs in national health care policy and has developed novel programs to expand oral care locally and in developing countries. For more information, visit dental.columbia.edu.

Columbia University Medical Center provides international leadership in basic, preclinical, and clinical research; medical and health sciences education; and patient care. The medical center trains future leaders and includes the dedicated work of many physicians, scientists, public health professionals, dentists, and nurses at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Mailman School of Public Health, the College of Dental Medicine, the School of Nursing, the biomedical departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and allied research centers and institutions. Columbia University Medical Center is home to the largest medical research enterprise in New York City and State and one of the largest faculty medical practices in the Northeast. The campus that Columbia University Medical Center shares with its hospital partner, NewYork-Presbyterian, is now called the Columbia University Irving Medical Center. For more information, visit cumc.columbia.edu or columbiadoctors.org.

Columbia University Medical Center

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